Chapter 5 Game Mechanics

Chapter 5: Game Mechanics
“We don’t have shields in our culture. It seems strange to my boy, I imagine. In our country, if you don’t want to get hit, you move out of the way.”
Akaviri Potentate Versidue-Shaie, “2920, The Last Year of the First Era”

T
he world of the Elder Scrolls can be a dangerous place. Wars, strange monsters, criminals, mercenaries, faction infighting, and any number of other scenarios can all force a party to use violence to accomplish their goals, or simply force the party into dangerous situations. This Chapter contains mechanics for resolving combat, as well as other game mechanics to handle the variety of situations the players might encounter during their adventures.
A Note on Time
The UESRPG divides time into two categories: narrative time and structured time. Narrative Time is meant to be used in any situations that do not demand the time-sensitive resolution of tasks. Functionally this means that almost any non-combat situation will use narrative time. In game terms, narrative time is a period in which the GM can freely advance time at any rate based on the needs of the story and the players. This could mean briefly describing the party’s long journey across a vast desert, or playing out an important social event hour by hour.
Structured Time is used to handle time-sensitive events in which every second counts and the order of actions is crucial. Combat almost always takes place in structured time. So while the GM could decide to handle it in narrative time instead, the rules for this Chapter assume that the GM is running combat using structured time.
ComBat
The largest unit of structured time is called an encounter. An Encounter represents an entire sequence of dramatic events that make up a unified “Block” of structured time that may be contained within sections of narrative time, or followed up by another encounter. Encounters focused on a particular combat scene are known as Combat Encounters.
Encounters are broken down into Rounds: periods of time in which characters take actions, representing roughly five seconds of “real” time. The core of each combat round is the Cycle: the countdown through initiative order so that each player has a chance to take their turn. There can be several cycles per combat round. During each Turn, the active character performs a combat action and resolves its effects. Any conditions affecting a character trigger at the start of their turn.

Combat Overview
Almost any combat encounter can be resolved by following these steps:
Step 1: Determine Surprise
If one or more characters aren’t expecting an attack, or aware of their attacker’s intentions, they have been surprised. The GM should determine which characters count as being surprised for the first round of combat. Surprised characters do not roll 1d5 for initiative, they simply use their Initiative Rating. They also may not take any actions during the first round of combat, and may only take reactions after their first turn has passed.
Step 2: Set the Scene
Before the characters can begin taking their turns, the GM should outline the parts of the scenario that they are aware of, including the combatants they face, the positions of everyone involved, and the environment they’re fighting in.
Step 3: Determine Initiative
To determine the order in which characters take their turns during each round of the combat, all characters involved must make an Initiative Roll (1d10 plus the character’s Initiative Rating, rolling off if two characters tie). The GM rolls for NPCs, and should roll once for larger groups of similar NPCs. Note that a character’s initiative can potentially be modified by events that occur within the encounter itself, so the GM should always be keeping track of initiative.
Step 4: Round Start
Starting with the character with the highest initiative, each character takes one turn. The character currently taking a turn is known as the active character. Once their turn is over, the character with the next highest initiative takes their turn, and so on until all characters have taken their turns. If any characters have remaining action points after each character has taken a turn, the cycle begins again with the highest initiative character that still has action points remaining.
Step 5: Round End
Repeat step 4 until all characters are out of action points: the round is now over. Any effects or Conditions that specify a
duration of “until the end of the round” end now.
Step 6: Encounter Ends
Repeat steps 4 and 5 until the combat is finished, or the event that triggered the switch into structured time is resolved.
Actions, Turns, and Cycles
Combat Actions represent all the things that a character can do during an encounter. The maximum number of times that a character can act during a round is determined by their Maximum Action Points. Characters may normally only take one combat action during a given turn, and if they don’t take an action they are assumed to have dithered. There are three types of combat actions: actions, reactions, and free actions.
Actions can only be taken during the character’s own turn (meaning only once per cycle). They are combat actions where the character is the instigator. An extended action is simply a series of the same action performed back to back across more than just one turn.
Reactions are actions that are taken to counter or resist other characters’ actions, or other events, that the character is aware of. Only one reaction attempt is permitted for each threat or event, but any number of reactions may be made per cycle (provided that the character has action points left for that round to spend).
Free Actions can be taken at any time during the combat round, and cost no action points to activate.

Actions
The following combat actions are all actions that a character can attempt on his turn by spending an action point. Note that some of these actions may take several turns to complete, each costing its own action point.
Aim
A character can spend a turn aiming in order to gain a +10 bonus to their next ranged attack. This bonus can stack, but only up to three times (for a maximum bonus of +30).
All-out Attack
When making an all-out attack, the character sacrifices their ability to defend themselves in order to better land an attack. The character makes a normal melee attack: the attack test is made at a +20 bonus, but he may not make any reactions until the beginning of his next turn.

Attack
The character can make an attack with a melee or ranged weapon.

Brace
The character braces himself against the direction he believes an attack will be coming from. This doubles the amount of damage required to cause knockback, and grants the character a +20 bonus to any test to resist knockback.
Cast Magic The character can attempt to cast a spell, use a shout, manifest a
congruence power, utilize a technique, activate a power, or use some other kind of magic ability. Some magic will specify that it counts as an attack, in which case the test to cast or manifest that magic is made as an attack roll, with the defender responding appropriately. Otherwise, it is made as normal. Attacks made with this action can never win special effects. For information,
see Chapter 6.

Change Range
The character can attempt to close on or retreat from an oppo­nent, changing the range at which he is fighting in order to take advantage of his weapon, or to disengage entirely. This is
automatically successful unless the opponent spends an action point. Opponents may react in one of two ways:
If the opponent chooses to pursue, then the opponent and the character attempting to change range make an opposed Evade test against one another. If the opponent wins, the character does not change range or withdraw, if he loses, the active character changes to his desired range or withdraws from the engagement.
Alternatively, the opponent can decide to attack the moving character instead (this costs an action point as usual). The closing character must defend against this attack with their Evade skill (this does not cost an action point). If the attack is successful, the active character changes range to his desired range or withdraws from the engagement. If this attack inflicts the Impale special effect on a character attempting to close range, the character does not change ranges to the closer range.

Coup de Grâce
The character can make a killing blow against a helpless target (a character who is unconscious, or otherwise completely incapable of defending themselves). The GM may rule that certain characters cannot be killed in this way, depending on the circumstances. This automatically kills the target.

Delay
The character conserves his action so he can instead perform a reaction at a later time. The action point cost of delaying is covered by whatever action is finally performed. If the delayed action is not taken before the character’s next turn (on the following cycle), then the action point is lost.

Dither
The character wastes his turn doing nothing useful.

Intimidating Shout
The character bellows loudly, attempting to strike fear into the hearts of his foes. The character makes an Intimidate skill test opposed by the Willpower of all targets within 20 meters. If a target fails to beat his result, they must reroll their next successful skill test within one round.
If the character performs this action while they have the Frenzied condition, and the target fails to beat his result, they also may not attempt to approach the target or make any melee attacks against him for the next round.

Mount
The character can mount or dismount a riding beast, though mounting large mounts may take more than one turn to
complete.

Move
The character can move at one of three speeds: walking, running, or sprinting. For information, see Movement & Encumbrance.

Outmaneuver
The character can engage multiple opponents, with whom he is engaged in melee combat, in an opposed Evade test. Those characters who fail to beat his result cannot attack him during that combat round.

Ready Weapon
The character may draw, sheath, withdraw, or reload a weapon. Retrieving a nearby dropped weapon requires two turns, one to move and retrieve the weapon, and another to return to a readied stance. Some missile weapons may require several turns to reload, in which case the character must take this action for the requisite number of turns in a row (reactions interrupt this).

Regain Footing
If not engaged in melee combat with an opponent, the character can regain his footing from being tripped or knocked down.

Struggle
If the character is the victim of certain types of attacks or special effects that restrict his movement, he may attempt to extract himself. For example: breaking free from a grapple or a pin weapon. This requires an opposed Strength or Combat Style (if it includes unarmed combat) test against the attacker. If the pinned victim wins, they break free.
Reactions These combat actions are all reactions that a character can use
at any time during the combat round in response to a threat or
event that he is aware of by spending an action point.

Attack of Opportunity
If an opponent uses the move action to simply move out of an engagement without the use of an appropriate action or effect (such as Change Range, Outmaneuver, or Withdraw), or would pass through a character’s engagement range with a move action, then the character may use this reaction to make a standard melee attack against that opponent.

Block
The character uses a shield to defend against an incoming ranged attack (either with a ranged weapon or a spell) or melee attack from an opponent he is aware of through the use of his Combat Style skill, throwing his shield arm between himself and the incoming attack.
Evade The character uses his Evade skill to defend against an incoming
attack. The character suffers a -20 penalty if the attack is ranged unless the character chooses to end his evasion prone.

Interrupt
If a character delayed his action from last turn, and it is not his next turn yet, he may halt an opponent’s turn in order to take his own delayed turn. Assuming no change in the situation, the opponent continues his turn after the characters is completed. If the opponent is unable to achieve his original declared action, his action point is wasted. An interrupt can also be used against anyone passing close by the delaying character (within Reach).
Parry The character uses a shield or melee weapon to defend against
an incoming melee attack from an opponent he is aware of through the use of his Combat Style skill.

Free Actions
Free actions can be performed at any time during the combat round and cost no action points. They include everything from talking, signalling, observing one’s surroundings, dropping items, and so forth. Use common sense when deciding what is and isn’t a free action.

Attacking & Defending
Combat is resolved blow by blow, with each attack and defense representing a single swing of, or Block with, a weapon. Any action is permitted the chance to be resisted by a reaction as long as the character is aware of the action. Thus there are two
sides to most combat interactions: the attack and the defense. The same core mechanic, known as a Combat Roll is used to resolve attacks of all types.
Step 1: Attack
On his turn the attacker spends an action point to use an attack action of some kind, chooses his target, his method of attack, and makes the appropriate attack test.
Melee Weapons
When using a melee weapon, the character rolls against the Combat Style of his choice, as long as the chosen Combat Style includes the melee weapon that he wishes to use for the attack. The character must be in melee combat with his target. The character can use either his Strength or Agility as a base for this Combat Style test. Attacks made with a one handed weapon wielded in the character’s off-hand suffer a -10 penalty.

Ranged Weapons
When using a ranged weapon, the character rolls against the Combat Style of his choice, as long as the chosen Combat Style includes the ranged weapon that he wishes to use for the attack. The character must use his Agility as a base for this Combat Style test.
Step 2: Defend
If desired, the defender spends an action point, chooses his method of defense, and makes the appropriate defense test. The character must be aware of the attack. If the attacker fails his attack test, the defender can choose whether or not to spend an action point to defend against the attack. It can still be advan­tageous to Parry a missed attack in order to gain special effects.

Evade
Characters may seek to Evade incoming melee or ranged attacks with the Evade reaction. The character rolls an Evade skill test as their defense test. Evading a ranged attack is done at a -20 penalty unless the character chooses to end his evasion prone.

Parry
Melee weapons or shields may be used to Parry melee attacks with the Parry reaction. The character rolls against the Combat Style of his choice, as long as the chosen Combat Style includes the melee weapon or shield he wishes to use for the Parry. The character can use either his Strength or Agility as a base for this Combat Style test.

Block
Shields may be used to Block incoming ranged or melee attacks with the Block reaction. The character rolls against the Combat Style of his choice, as long as the chosen Combat Style includes the shield he wishes to use for the Block. The character can use either his Strength or Agility as a base for this Combat Style test.
Step 3: Determine Result
If both the attacker and the defender fail their attack and defense test, then nothing happens and the turn ends. If one or both characters passed their test, then compare the results to see if a character received special effects. If a defender does not try to defend, he is treated as having automatically rolled a failure.
Special Effects represent the many special techniques that characters, attackers or defenders, can employ in combat. Magical attacks (Cast Magic action) can never win special effects. The table below describes the number of special effects a character acquires based on the results of a given combat roll:

Attacker
Defender

*In the event the characters both succeed at the same level (both normal or critical successes) and the attacker achieves more degrees of success than the defender, then the effect of the successful defense is negated (though the attacker does not win any special effects).
Step 4: Resolve Attack
If the attacker passed his attack test, his attack hits the target and deals damage. He may also apply any special effects gained from the combat roll, though he must do so before he calculates damage.
If the defender passed his defense test, he either negates the attack entirely or reduces its damage (depending on his method of defense). He may also apply any special effects gained from the combat roll, though he must do so before he calculates damage. When two or more special effects are gained on an attack or defense, the character may freely mix and match which ones are selected provided he meets the prerequisite conditions for each one, and some effects can be stacked.

Resolving Attacks
When an attack hits a target, first determine its hit location using the ones digit of the attack roll.
Hit Locations

0 Head
1-2 Right Arm
3-4 Left Arm
5-7 Body
8 Right Leg
9 Left Leg

Next, roll for the damage of the attack (adding the character’s Damage Bonus to the total, for melee weapons) to determine the damage dealt by that attack. The next step varies based on the method of attack and defense:
Ranged Attacks
Ranged attacks, either shots from ranged weapons or projectiles created by spells, can be blocked or evaded. If any damage from the attack remains afterwards, it is dealt to the hit location of the attack (reducing the location’s AR by the penetration of the attack). See Physical Health for information on how to deal and calculate the effects of damage.
Blocked
If an attack from a ranged weapon is blocked by a shield it deals damage to the character’s shield arm instead of its original hit location, and that damage is reduced by the AR of the shield as well as the AR of the arm.

Evaded
If an attack from a ranged weapon is evaded it is negated entirely and deals no damage.
Melee Attacks
Attacks from melee weapons can be parried, blocked, or evaded. If any damage from the attack remains afterwards, it is dealt to the hit location of the attack (reducing the location’s AR by the penetration of the attack). See Physical Health for information on how to deal and calculate the effects of damage.

Parried
If an attack from a melee weapon is parried by another melee weapon or shield, the damage from the attack can potentially be negated according to the relative size of the weapons.

Parrying with a weapon or shield of one size less (or larger) than the attacking one negates the attack entirely.


Parrying with a weapon or shield of two or more sizes less than the attacking one does nothing.

Blocked
If an attack from a melee weapon is blocked by a shield it deals damage to the character’s shield arm instead of whatever its original hit location would have been.

If the shield is one size less (or larger) than the attacking weapon, that damage is reduced by the AR of the shield as well as the AR of the arm.


If the shield is two or more sizes less than the attacking weapon, that damage is reduced by half the AR of the shield (round down) as well as the AR of the arm.

Note that this is separate from passive blocking, which is covered in Melee Combat.

Evaded
If an attack from a melee weapon is evaded, it is negated entirely and deals no damage.

Weapon Size & Reach
Every weapon possesses a number of different attributes, ranging from the damage it deals to how many hands are required to wield it. Two of these ratings, which are unique to melee weapons, are particularly important:
Size is used to determine a weapon’s ability to impose and Parry damage. Size categories are: small, medium, large, huge, and enormous.
Reach can affect whether an opponent lies within range of being struck. Reach categories are: touch, short, medium, long, and very long.
Weapon Size Categories

Human unarmed combat and light, one
Small
handed weapons such as daggers.
One handed weapons over a kilogram in
Medium
weight, such as a mace.
Long hafted thrusting weapons, such as
Large
spears.
Two handed slashing, chopping or bashing
Huge
weapons, like great swords
Enormous Weapons used by large creatures.

Weapon Reach Categories

Human reach in unarmed combat, brass
Touch
knuckles, and so forth.
Weapons less than half a meter long, such
Short
as a dagger or short sword.
Single handed swung weapons longer than
Medium
half a meter, such as a flail.
Single handed thrusting weapons, or two
Long
handed swung weapons, such as a great axe.
Two handed or mounted thrusting weapons,
Very Long
such as polearms or lances.
In general, when two combatants face one another armed with weapons of disproportionate length, the wielder of the longer weapon can keep his opponent at bay and prevent him from attacking. If the wielder of the shorter weapon can step inside the effective range of the longer, then the tables turn and the combatant with the longer weapon will find himself unable to Parry.
Thus melee combat engagements can be split into two ranges: shorter, and longer. This is assuming a Reach difference of two or more steps between the longer and shorter weapon. Any smaller, and the difference isn’t meaningful and the characters simply fight at the same range, both able to attack and defend as normal.
A character can close or open range in two ways: the Close/Open Range special effect, and the Change Range combat action.
Fighting at the Longer Reach
If fighting at the Reach of the longer weapon, then the user of the shorter weapon cannot directly attack the wielder of the longer. They are still considered to be engaged, since the longer weapon can still reach them.
If the longer weapon is the natural weapon of a creature, the user of the shorter weapon can directly attack the limb assaulting them.
Additionally, the GM should use common sense when deciding which special effects work at this range, as some of them could lead to odd results in certain circumstances.
Fighting at the Shorter Reach
In the converse situation where the fighters are engaged at the Reach of the shorter weapon, the user of the longer weapon will find he cannot Parry the attacks of the shorter. The user of the longer weapon can still attack with the haft or hilt of his now encroached weapon, but this is not very effective, and the character halves all damage dealt (after damage has been rolled, but before any mitigation).

Special Effects
Fighting is more than simply injuring or killing an opponent: there are many ways to defeat one’s foe. Special effects represent the many techniques that can be utilized in combat. During combat rolls, it is possible for a character to receive more than one special effect. This reflects a combatant maneuvering his opponent into a disadvantageous situation that can be exploited for further gain. If special effects are won during an exchange, they must be selected before damage is rolled and resolved.
Certain special effects have unique requirements for their use. When two or more special effects are gained on an attack or defense, the character may freely mix and match which ones are selected provided he meets the prerequisite conditions for each one, and some effects can be stacked. Magical attacks made with the Cast Magic action can never win special effects.
Finally, it is important to use common sense when deciding when a given special effect can and cannot be used.
Accidental Injury (Defender only) Requires: Opponent cannot be using a Very Long weapon.
Critical failure on the attack test. Cannot be used on Evade. Effect: The defender deflects or twists an opponent’s attack in such a way that the opponent fumbles, injuring himself. The attacker must roll damage against himself in a random hit location using the weapon he used on the attack. If unarmed, he tears or breaks something internal, the damage roll ignores armor.
Arise (Defender only) Requires: Defender must be prone to start. Effect: Allows the defender to use a momentary opening to roll back up to their feet if they had been prone before.
Bash (Attacker only) Requires: Shield, or a melee weapon with the Concussive quality. Target character cannot be a Size larger than the attacker. Effect: The attacker bashes the opponent off balance, the attack knocks an opponent back one meter for every three degrees of success. If the defender is forced back into an obstacle than they must make an Acrobatics test opposed against the original attack roll to avoid falling prone.
Blind Opponent (Defender only) Requires: Critical success on the defense test. Effect: The defender blinds his opponent by throwing sand, reflecting light off his shield, or some other tactic which inter­feres with the attacker’s vision. The attacker must make an Evade skill test (or a Combat Style test, if using a shield) opposed against the defender’s original defense roll. If the attacker fails he gains the Blind condition for 1d2 turns.
Choose Location (Attacker only) Effect: The attacker may freely select the hit location where his attack lands.
Circumvent Defense (Attacker only) Effect: The attacker may completely ignore an otherwise suc­cessful Evade, Parry or Block.
Close Range Effect: Permits the character to automatically change the engage­ment range between him and an opponent so that they end up at the range favored by the shorter weapon.
Compel Surrender (Attacker only) Requires: Target is a non-player character. Effect: Allows the character to compel the surrender of a helpless or disadvantaged opponent (if, for example, they are disarmed or prone). Damage is not inflicted on the target, they are only threatened (a dagger to the throat, for example). Assuming the target is able to understand the demand, they must make a Willpower test opposed against the original attack test or else they capitulate.
“The Prince’s longblade slashed across the Akavir’s chest and the sudden, intense pain caused him to drop both his weapons. In a moment, it was over. Savirien-Chorak was prostrate in the dust with the Prince’s longsword at his throat.
“The game’s over!” shouted the Emperor, barely heard over the applause from the stadium.”
“2920, The Last Year of the First Era”
Disarm Opponent Requires: Target’s cannot be a Size larger than the attacker, the two characters must be engaged in melee. Cannot be used on an Evade. Effect: The character knocks, yanks, or twists the opponent’s weapon from his hand. The opponent must make a Combat Style test opposed against the character’s original roll. If the target of the disarm attempt loses, his weapon is flung a number of meters equal to the Damage Bonus of the disarmer. Each step that the disarming character’s weapon is larger than the victim’s weapon imposes a -10 penalty to the test. Conversely, each step that the disarming character’s weapon is smaller than the victim’s weapon grants a +10 bonus to the test.
Enhance Parry (Defender only) Requires: Can only be used on a Parry. Effect: On a Parry, the defender completely negates the attack regardless of the Size of his weapon.
Entangle (Attacker only)
Requires: Weapon with the Entangling quality.
Effect: Allows the character to immobilize the location struck.
An entangled arm cannot use whatever it is holding, a snared
leg prevents the target from moving, while an enmeshed head,
check or abdomen imposes a -20 on all skill rolls that involve
movement. On his following turn the attacker can spend an
action point to make an automatic Trip Opponent attempt using
the rules for that Special Effect (opposed against his original
attack test). An entangled victim can attempt to free himself on
his turn by either attempting an opposed Strength test against
the entangler, or by achieving a special effect and choosing
Damage Weapon, Disarm Opponent, or Slip Free.

Flurry (Attacker only)
Requires: Attacker is making an unarmed attack.
Effect: Attacker can make an immediate follow up unarmed
attack using a different limb or body part, without needed to
wait for his next turn. This attack still costs an action point,
but potentially allows for several attacks in sequence before the
defender can respond offensively.

Force Failure
Requires: Opponent critically failed their attack/defense test.
Effect: This character may combine Force Failure with any
other special effect which requires an opposed roll (assuming
they achieved more than one special effect in the first place).
Causes the opponent to fail that roll by default: meaning he is
automatically disarmed, tripped, etc.

Grip (Attacker only)
Requires: Defender must be within the attacker’s unarmed
Reach (typically Touch).
Effect: The character uses an empty hand to grab the defender,
preventing them from being able to change range or disen­gage from combat. The opponent may make either an opposed
Strength or a Combat Style (if it includes unarmed combat) test
against the attacker. If the gripped victim wins, they break free.

Impale (Attacker only)
Requires: Weapon with the Impaling quality.
Effect: The attacker rolls weapon damage twice, choosing the
higher result. If the armor is penetrated and causes at least a
major wound, then the attacker has the option of leaving he
weapon in the wound, or yanking it free on their next turn.
Use common sense when deciding when certain weapons can
be impaled in a character’s limbs or head.

Leaving the weapon in the wound inflicts a -10 penalty on the
victim’s future skill tests, plus an additional -10 penalty for each
weapon Size category above Medium.

Yanking the weapon free requires the attacker to make a Strength test (which can be opposed, if the opponent wants to resist). Success pulls the weapon free and causes further harm: roll damage for the weapon, halve the result (round down) and deal that much damage to the hit location that the weapon was lodged in. The attacker does not add his Damage Bonus to this damage roll, and the damage is not mitigated by armor.
Any wounds caused by the weapon when it is impaled in the character cannot be healed unless the weapon is removed.
Kill Silently (Attacker only) Requires: Surprised opponent. Can only be used on the first attack against an opponent. Effect: The attacker can neutralize the victim in complete silence by going for their throat. This prevents the victim from crying out or otherwise raising an alarm for an entire round. The attack is resolved against the character’s head area and gains the benefit of the Bypass Armor special effect. If the attack inflicts a crippling wound (or higher), the victim automatically fails any Endurance rolls required by the shock effects of the wound.
Maximize Damage (Attacker only) Effect: The character may substitute one of his damage dice on the attack for its maximum value. For example, a weapon that deals 2d10 damage would deal 1d10+10 instead.
Open Range (Defender only) Effect: Permits the character to automatically change the engage­ment range between him and his opponent so that they end up at the range favored by the longer weapon.
Overextend Opponent (Defender only) Requires: Can only be used on an Evade. Effect: The character sidesteps or retreats at an inconvenient moment, causing the attacker to overreach himself. The oppo­nent cannot attack during his next turn.
Penetrate Armor (Attacker only) Requires: Weapon with the Impaling quality. Effect: The attacker finds a weaker point in the defender’s natural or worn armor. The attacker reduces the AR of the target’s natural or worn armor by X for the purposes of calculating the damage inflicted by this attack. X is twenty if the weapon’s size (impale size for ranged weapons) is Small, fifteen if it’s Medium, ten if it’s Large, or five if it’s Huge or Enormous. Cannot be used to reduce armor gained through magic effects.
Pin Weapon Requires: Cannot be used on an Evade. Effect: The character can pin one of his opponent’s weapons or shield using his body or positioning to hold it in place. On his turn, the opponent may attempt to wrestle or maneuver the pinned item free for one action point: they may make either an opposed Strength or a Combat Style (if it includes unarmed combat) test against the attacker. If the pinned victim wins, they break free.
Press Advantage (Attacker only) Requires: Attack is using a melee weapon. Effect: The attacker pressures his opponent so that his foe is forced to remain on the defensive and cannot attack on their next turn. This allows the attacker to potentially establish an unbroken sequence of attacks while the defender desperately tries to stave them off.
Rapid Reload (Attacker only) Requires: Attack is using a ranged weapon. Effect: The attacker reduces the reload time for the next shot by one. This effect can be stacked.
Redirect Target (Defender only) Requires: New target must be within Reach of the attacker’s weapon (if melee) or range and line of fire (if ranged). Can only be used on a Parry or Evade. Effect: The defender may maneuver or redirect the blow such that it hits an adjacent bystander instead. The new victim is taken completely by surprise and has no chance to defend against the attack, which automatically hits. No special effects may be used by or against the new target.
Slip Free (Defender only) Effect: The defender can escape being Entangled, Gripped, or Pinned.
Stand Fast (Defender only) Requires: Cannot be used on an Evade. Effect: The defender braces himself against the force of an attack, allowing them to avoid the Knockback effects of the attack.
Stun Location (Attacker only) Requires: Melee weapon with the Concussive or Stunning quality. Target cannot be more than one Size larger than attacker. Effect: The attacker uses a Concussive weapon to temporar­ily stun the body part struck. If the attack overcomes armor and deals damage to the target, the defender must make an Endurance test opposed against the original attack roll (with a bonus to the test equal to his AR on the hit location, rounded to the nearest multiple of ten).
If the defender fails, then the hit location is crippled for one round. If the blow is to the body or head, he is simply stunned for 1 round instead.
Sunder (Attacker only) Requires: Weapon with the Sundering quality. Effect: The attacker may use the Choose Location special effect for free. If the attack overcomes the armor and deals damage to the target, the armor on that hit location loses X AR where X half is the amount of damage dealt to the target after mitigation (round down).
Take Weapon Requires: Character has at least one free hand, and his opponent is wielding a melee weapon. Target’s Strength bonus is less than double the character’s Strength bonus. Cannot be used on an Evade. Effect: Allows a character to yank or twist an opponent’s weapon out of his hand. The opponent must make an opposed roll of his Combat Style (assuming it includes the use of unarmed combat) against the character’s original Combat Style roll. If the target loses, his weapon is taken and from that moment on, may be used by the character instead.
Trip Opponent Effect: The character attempts to overbalance or throw his opponent to the ground. The opponent must make an opposed roll of Strength, Evade, or Acrobatics against the character’s original roll. If the target fails, he falls prone. Opponents with the Quadruped trait may substitute their Athletics skill for Evade and gain a +10 bonus to the test.
“As they sprang at each other, the crowd bellowed with delight. The Akaviri was like a moon in orbit around the Prince, effortlessly springing over his shoulder to attempt a blow from behind, but the Prince whirled around quickly to Block with his shield. His counter-strike met only air as his foe fell flat to the ground and slithered between his legs, tripping him. The Prince fell to the ground with a resounding crash.”
“2920, The Last Year of the First Era”
Withdraw (Defender only) Requires: Can only be used on a Parry or Evade. Effect: The defender can automatically withdraw out of reach, breaking out of the melee combat engagement with that par­ticular opponent. This cannot incur an attack of opportunity from that opponent.

Melee Combat
Melee combat is any combat that happens within several meters, where participants fight either with wielded or natural weapons. This section contains further circumstantial melee combat rules, and rules for specific uses of melee weapons and shields. Like all tests, tests made in melee combat should always be subject to
difficulty based on the environment or circumstances in which the combat is happening.
Combat Circumstance Modifiers
The following table provides modifiers for combat related tests for the many situations that characters may find themselves in while fighting.
Combat Circumstances

Attacking in a confined area. -20
Defending while on lower ground or against a
-20
mounted foe.
Fighting on unstable ground. -20
Fighting while crouching or on one knee. -20
Fighting in poor visibility (fog, snowstorm). -10
Defending against an attack from behind (assuming the character is aware of the attack). -30
Fighting while prone. -30
Fighting in partial darkness. -10
Fighting in total darkness. -30
Blinded or loss of primary perceptive sense. -40

Charging
Charging is the act of moving quickly to enter a fight and increase the force and impact of an attack. There are two main types of charging, depending on whether or not the character wishes to stop in engagement range with the target, or continue sweeping past, through or over the target. Note that charges are not limited to running characters, and can be performed in flight or under water as well. In general, all charges share the following rules:

A charge requires a minimum of two full turns of movement at fast or flat out speed prior to contact.


A charge imposes a -10 penalty to the attack roll.


A charge adds the attacker’s Movement Rating to his Damage Bonus on the attack. In addition, the size of the attacking weapon is counted as being one step larger.

The recipient of a charge has four different options: attempt to Parry, Block, Evade, or simultaneously counterattack the
charging attacker.
Parrying or blocking a charge attack causes the defender to suffer from knockback. Use of the brace combat action in advance of the charge attack can help mitigate these effects.
Evading a charge attack throws the defender completely clear of the charging character.
Counterattacking sacrifices the defender’s opportunity to actively defend himself against the charge in exchange for a chance to injure the attacker. In such cases, both sides are treated as having failed to Parry. The wielder of the weapon with the longest Reach strikes first. If using a long shafted weapon with the Impaling quality which can be set against a charge, the Defender can add the Movement Rating of his charging opponent (or his mount, if applicable) to his own Damage Bonus for the attack.

Charging into Contact
Some charges are intended as a method to crash into the oppo­nent then remain in place to take advantage of any chaos created. Once the charge strikes, the attacker is considered engaged with his opponent, and from that moment combat proceeds normally. Benefits gained from the charge are lost after the first attack.

Charging Through Contact
The second type of charge uses momentum to carry the attacker through and clear of a potential engagement. This is normally limited to mounted combatants or larger ones unlikely to be hindered by smaller foes. The speed of such charges prevents the attacker and defender from exchanging more than a single action with each other (namely the charge attack and the defender’s reaction to it [Evade, Block, Parry, or counter attack]). Since the charge attack occurs on the attacker’s turn, they will have already been carried clear by the time the defender’s turn arrives.
Cover
Cover is used by characters to obstruct attacks against them, either in ranged or close combat. This occurs by either physically blocking a blow, or by obscuring the exact location of the target.
In the case of partial cover, any attack against a target which
lands on an obscured hit location will be blocked to the extent
of the cover’s inherent protection as determined by the GM. The effects of cover can be partially negated either by use of the Choose Location special effect, or striking through the cover if the weapon is capable of penetrating it.
In situations where cover is total but the attacker knows his attack will penetrate, he may strike blindly at the hidden target. In such cases the attack roll is made at a -30 penalty and Choose Location may not be taken if a special effect is won. This assumes the cover does not allow the target to move freely behind it, and thus the attacker can guess his rough position.
Engagement
An important concept of melee combat is engagement. A char­acter is considered to be engaged in melee combat if he is within melee weapon Reach of his opponent. This does not mean that both combatants can physically reach each other, only that one of them is roughly within striking range of the other. If there is a reach difference of two or more steps between a character entering an engagement and one of his opponents, the character entering the fight begins at the longer reach.
Once a character is engaged, breaking out of the fight is nor­mally performed via a combat action such as Change Range, or Outmaneuver, but characters can take advantage of opportuni­ties gained during a combat roll to disengage through the use of certain special effects as well. Alternatively, a character can simply use the move action to move out of engagement range. If a character does this, or would move through a potential opponent’s engagement range with a move action, then the opponent may take the attack of opportunity reaction.
Characters can also engage multiple foes at once, provided they are all within close proximity of each other. This can occur in many ways, and exactly what qualifies as being engaged with a group is left to the GM. In such situations, each character within the combat may choose which foe he wishes to attack. Withdrawing from engagement in this circumstance depends on the distribution of foes.
Evading ranged attacks originating from outside an engagement while engaged is done at a -20 penalty.
Flying Combat
Fighting against flying creatures, or full scale aerial battles, can provide an interesting dynamic to combat.

Attacking Ground Based Targets
If the flying creature is making attacks by “strafing” its target, it is recommended to handle each strafing run as Charging through Contact. This can make airborne creatures deadly unless defenders have ranged weaponry or cover.

Aerial Combat Aloft
Combat between flying creatures or characters mounted on flying creatures should be handled slightly differently. It often takes a lot of time to get into a position where one airborne opponent can assault the other. Each brief engagement only allows one of them to attack before the creatures move apart, requiring them to maneuver again to see which gets the upper hand in the next pass.
Thus at the start of each round combatants must make an opposed Agility test (or the Ride skill, if one or both charac­ters are mounted). The winner is the one who can attack that round. If facing multiple opponents, use a group opposed roll and all those who beat the lone participant may attack that round. Attacks are resolved in a similar manner to charges. In the case of particularly large or fast creatures, the GM should increase the maneuvering time between passes to several rounds. In these cases mounted archers or spell casters can only act on each pass, as the rider is thrown about during aerial acrobatics,
or the target might be out of range.

Improvised Weaponry
In certain cases a character might find themselves forced to fight using improvised weaponry. Attacks with improvised weapons suffer a -10 penalty on top of any penalties for the character’s unfamiliarity with the type of weapon that they are most similar to. The table below provides a set of guidelines for the GM.

Improvised Weaponry Profile Guidelines

Small 1d5 R/I 0/5 S Varies
Medium 1d10 R/I 0/5 M Varies
Large 2d10 R/I 5/10 L Varies
Huge 3d10 R/I 10/15 H Varies

Knockback
Some attacks will result in the target being knocked back. On receiving such a blow, the defender must pass an Acrobatics or Strength test with a +20 bonus, to avoid falling prone. They are also pushed backwards by one meter for every 15 points of damage dealt by the attack (before mitigation). Proactively using the Brace combat action can help resist these effects.
Leaping Attacks
A leaping attack is an attack in which an attacker leaps upon a target, knocking them prone. This is a unique attack type that can only be performed in certain unique circumstances, and usually requires a talent or trait. A leaping attack is resolved with an opposed test between the leaper’s Athletics skill and the defender’s Strength or Evade skill. If the leaper wins then the defender is automatically knocked prone with the attacker astride them. If the attack fails, the defender has weathered or sidestepped the impact. This counts as a combat roll, meaning characters can gain special effects from the results of the tests.
No damage is inflicted as part of the leap, but a subsequently prone victim cannot recover his footing until either his attacker leaves him, or he gets a Special Effect permitting him to get back up. Leap attacks only work against opponents of up to two size brackets larger than the character. A target can make themselves more difficult to knock down by the proactive use of the Brace combat action.
Multiple Opponents
Facing multiple opponents can be dangerous. While a character suffers no penalties for doing so, he can soon become swamped and run out of action points with which to defend himself. Once all his actions have been expended the character is treated as having failed his defense roll against any subsequent attacks, meaning he quickly becomes vulnerable to special effects from the opponents he was unable to defend against.
Outmaneuvering
A character facing multiple opponents can use movement to limit the number that can attack him at any given point in time. This works by constantly shifting position, forcing opponents to re-establish lines of attack and causing them to interfere with each other. This requires that the character have room to move about, and assumes that the character is engaged with more than one foe.
Outmaneuvering requires the character engage his opponents in a group opposed roll of Evade skills. Each participant, both the maneuvering character and those who wish to corner him must spend an action point. Then they each roll once, and those who fail to beat the maneuvering character’s roll cannot attack him for the remainder of that combat round. If the maneuvering character beats all of his opponents, he has the choice to safely engage a single foe for the rest of the round, or withdraw from the fight completely.
Passive Blocking
A character may choose to use a shield in such a way that it effectively acts as cover. The type of shield will determine the number of locations that can be passively blocked. The character choses a number of hit locations up to this maximum value to defend: these locations must be adjacent. Establishing a passive Block is a free action, but it can only be taken on the character’s turn, and once the action is taken that shield cannot break guard in order to Block an attack until the character’s next turn. A character can crouch behind the shield to double the number of locations guarded.
Passive blocking works just like cover, meaning that when they would be attacked the guarded hit locations add the AR of the shield to their own AR. The Choose Location special effect cannot be used to bypass the shield.
Pulled Blows
A character may, if they so desire, pull a blow such as to not kill an opponent. A pulled blow halves the damage inflicted on a successful attack (before mitigation by armor), but the intent must be stated before the attack is made since it is near possible to withhold a fully committed strike once it has been launched.
Sweep Attacks
Sweep attacks occur when weapons or characters of unusual size attack a closely clumped group of opponents. Characters with Huge or Enormous weapons may make sweep attacks. A sweep attack is made by applying a single attack test to all targets in the object’s path. Each defender must resolve the effects of the attack separately and any special effects imposed on the attacker are treated as having occurred concurrently.
Sweep attacks can also be used for other “area effect” assaults, such as an overhead smashing attack. The GM decides how many foes are caught in the attack based on the situation.
Unarmed Combat
Unarmed combat is when a character fights using their natural weapons. Characters are always capable of attempting to fight in this manner, even if they do not have a Combat Style skill that includes unarmed combat, they do so by rolling a test against their Strength or Agility, with the standard -10 penalty for using an untrained skill.
A character’s natural weapons use the profile specified below unless the character has the Natural Weapons (*) trait (which overrides the default profile). If a character has a Combat Style that includes unarmed combat, that style can be used for attacks with the character’s natural weapons. Natural weapons ignore rules regarding one, two, or hand and a half weapons.

Default Natural Weapons Profile

Natural Weapons 1d10-1 I 0 S T

Parrying while Unarmed
If an unarmed combatant is within the shorter engagement range when facing an opponent with a longer Reach weapon, he reduces the effective Size of his opponent’s weapon by one step for the purposes of parrying, as it is much easier for him to Parry blows at that range without injury.
Parrying attacks from an armed opponent does not actually negate the attack. A successful parry only serves to negate any potential special effects the opponent may have won, or provide an opportunity for the character to gain their own. On a success­ful attack that is successfully parried by an unarmed character, the attacking character still hits and deals damage as normal.

Striking while Unarmed
Using unarmed combat to attack is resolved in the same way as normal attacks, though some special effects are specifically reserved for unarmed combat, namely Flurry, Grip, and Take Weapon. Profiles for various natural weapons, ranging from human natural weapons, to the jaws or talons of animals, can be found in Weapons in Chapter 7.

Grappling
Grappling attacks are resolved like normal attacks. The effects
of grappling depend on the location struck. A grappled limb

is rendered unusable while a grappled head or torso imposes a -20 penalty against skill tests that require movement.
On his following turn, the grappler may make unarmed attacks to inflict Impact damage (equal to his Damage Bonus and mitigated by armor) to the body part by crushing, twisting, or strangulating it. If the target is the head, then this damage doubles each turn that this attack is repeated as the character suffocates his victim (this also damage ignores armor, assuming he can reach the character’s throat or suffocate him somehow). He may also make standard attacks, which are defended in the normal way. A grapple continues until the attacker stops or the victim breaks free. Escape attempts are performed using the Struggle combat action.
Grappling requires that the limb being used is empty and capa­ble of somehow restricting the target.
Unusual Combat Scenarios
There are several odd combat scenarios characters may find themselves in. Generally the GM should just use common sense, but specific rules have been provided for these sections.

Climbing
A climbing character has all of this combat rolls capped by his Athletics skill rank (if he has a higher Combat Style rank, he treats it as having his Athletics rank instead). Characters are limited to fighting with a single limb, unless they have extras for some reason.

Slippery Surfaces
A character fighting on slippery or wobbling surfaces has all of this combat rolls capped by his Acrobatics skill rank (if he has a higher Combat Style rank, he treats it as having his Acrobatics rank instead). If the character fails a combat roll in these cir­cumstances, he must pass an Acrobatics test or fall prone.

Swimming
A climbing character has all of this combat rolls capped by his Athletics skill rank (if he has a higher Combat Style rank, he treats it as having his Athletics rank instead). Weapons with­out the Impale quality are useless underwater, though attacks involving natural weapons are unaffected.

Swinging or Jumping
A character swinging or jumping into (or disengaging from) combat has all of this combat rolls capped by his Acrobatics skill rank (if he has a higher Combat Style rank, he treats it as having his Acrobatics rank instead). If the character fails a combat roll in these circumstances, he must pass an Acrobatics test or fall prone, and suffer any appropriate fall damage.

Ranged Combat
Ranged combat incorporates all forms of weapons which must be shot, thrown, or slung at their target. The ranged weapons a character can use are listed as part of their Combat Style skills.
Ranged attacks are resolved just as melee attacks are. However, ranged attacks can only be Evaded or Blocked with shields. Ranged weapons have no listed Size or Reach, and instead have two unique attributes that distinguish them from melee weapons:
Range is defined in terms of three numbers, representing the maximum Close, Effective, and Long ranges of the weapon or its ammunition. Attacking targets in Close range provides a +20 bonus to attack tests with the weapon, while attacking targets at Long range imposes a -20 penalty.
Reload represents the number of turns required to reload a weapon which fires ammunition. This requires the use of the Ready Weapon action.
Situational Modifiers
The following table provides some situational modifiers specific to ranged weapons.

Ranged Combat Circumstances

Light Wind -10
Moderate Wind -20
Strong Wind -30
Gale, Storm or Worse -60
Target is Running -10
Target is Sprinting -20
Target obscured by mist or partial darkness -10
Target obscured by thick smoke, fog, or darkness -20
Target completely obscured -40

Blinded or loss of primary perceptive sense -60
Target prone -20
Attacker is prone* -40
Attacker is on unstable ground -20

*Can be ignored if using a crossbow
Firing into Melee Combat
Firing into a melee engagement can be risky,. Thus there is always a risk of accidentally striking someone other than the intended target. When firing at a specific target on the edge of a crowd or melee, the attack suffers a penalty of at least -10. If firing through a group to hit a target in the middle or on the other side, the penalty should be at least -30.
If the marksman fails his attack test, but would have succeeded if not for the penalty imposed by firing into the crowd, then an adjacent victim is struck instead. The GM determines who it is, if there are multiple options. No matter who eventually becomes the target, if they are aware of the attack they can attempt to defend against it. Any special effects gained as part of the attack only apply to the original target.
Firing in Melee Combat
In certain circumstances a character may wish to make a ranged attack while engaged in melee combat. This is difficult, as oppo­nents will typically attempt to stop the character from lining up a shot. If a character attempts to make a ranged attack while engaged in melee combat his opponents may make an attack of opportunity reaction against him, and if at least one of them does so then the character’s ranged attack fails.
Firing on the Move
A character can use ranged weapons even while mounted, how­ever their Combat Style skill is capped by the Ride skill of the personal controlling the mount (if their Combat Style rank exceeds their Ride skill rank, use their Ride skill rank instead). For more information on moving and attacking, see Movement & Encumbrance.
Impaling Ranged Attacks
Ranged weapon projectiles which result in an impale, such as an arrow or thrown javelin, can be yanked free by anyone who can reach the target and tear it free.
Loading Ranged Weapons
Before a ranged weapon can be used, it must be either read­ied or loaded. Throwing weapons must be drawn or raised in preparation. This normally only requires one turn to complete using the Ready Weapon action provided it is within reach. If a second throwing weapon is held in preparation in the off-hand, the caster can swap it over to his throwing hand as a free action.
Projectile weapons, such as slings or bows, must be loaded. The number of turns this takes is determined by its Reload.
Area of Effect Attacks
Some ranged attacks, typically spells, affect an area. Area of effect attacks can only be defended against by evading. If the character passes the test with degrees of success equal to or greater than the distance between them and the edge of the area of effect, they successfully move out of the area. If the character passes with few degrees of success, or fails, they do not move out of the area of effect and are hit. Roll for hit location instead of using the ones digit of the attack roll. Either way, attempting to Evade an area of effect attack renders the character prone.

Combat Styles
Fighting skills are packaged into Combat Styles, which repre­sent the complete package of training, tactics, and experience that constitutes a specific style of combat. Combat Styles can be associated with culture, careers, or even schools of combat.
Specifically, individual Combat Styles are represented by the Combat Style [Field] skill, where the field represents the name of the combat style. This skill is used to make melee (or ranged) attack and defense tests in combat when using the equipment associated with the style. The character may use either his Strength or Agility as a base for the skill test when making melee attack or defense tests, but must use his Agility for the test when making ranged attacks.
Rather than creating preset combat styles we have allowed play­ers and GMs to invent their own to more accurately reflect the characters they wish to portray:
Trained Equipment
Each Combat Style has an associated set of weapon and shield types. A character with that Combat Style is capable of using that equipment effectively in the situations the style is designed for. Combat Styles may encompass up to four different types of equipment. Unarmed combat is included in this category as well, reflecting that the character is trained to fight with only his natural weapons.
Each style’s associated trained equipment is chosen when the character learns the style, and it can be expanded to a maximum of eight different types of equipment. Expanding a combat style by adding a weapon or shield type to the list of a style’s trained equipment costs 25 XP.
Utilizing Untrained Weapons
Occasionally characters may be forced to use a weapon that they have not specifically trained to use. The difficulty of the Combat Style test to use such weapons will vary with how different, or similar, the weapon is to a weapon the character is trained to use with that style:

If the weapon is completely unfamiliar to a character, he cannot use a Combat Style, and instead must use half of his Strength or Agility as a base for combat tests.


If the weapon is substantially different from a trained weapon (in weight, size, length, or method of use), then the character may use his Combat Style for that weapon, but does so at a -20 penalty.


If the weapon is reasonably different from a trained weapon (say, a great sword when the combatant uses broadswords), then the character may use his Combat Style for that weapon, but does so at a -10 penalty.


If the weapon is similar to a trained weapon (a scimitar, as opposed to a broadsword, for example), then the character may use his Combat Style for that weapon, but does so at a -5 penalty.

Fighting in Unfamiliar Circumstances
Occasionally characters may be forced to fight with familiar weapons, but in strange circumstances. For example, a noble duelist who is used to fighting honorable one on one fencing duels might somehow find himself in a bar brawl with his sword handy. Generally most characters are trained to use the weapons in their style in widely applicable circumstances, but in certain cases the GM shouldn’t be afraid to impose a -10 penalty on Combat Style tests made by a character who is dramatically out of his element.

phySiCal health

During the course of the players’ adventures, it is very likely that they will suffer injury of some kind. The following section explains how to handle damage, fatigue, and related matters.

Damage
Damage represents the potential of an attack to harm a character by causing trauma. Characters’ bodies are divided into several specific hit locations: either the body, the head, the left arm, the right arm, the left leg, or the right leg. All damage to the character is against one of these locations, and this can change how the damage affects the character.
There are also several different types of damage that a character can be subjected to. These three ingredients, the amount of damage, the damage type, and the hit location, are used to calculate the effects of damage and whether or not the character suffers a wound.
Damage Types
All damage is divided into two overarching damage types, with one special damage type:
First is Physical damage, which can be further divided into Rending damage, which covers slashing and tearing attacks, and Impact damage, which covers blunt trauma of all types.
Second is Magic damage, which can be further divided into Fire, Frost, and Shock damage.
Third is Poison damage, reflecting toxins and poisons that can harm characters.
Damage and Hit Locations
If a character has taken damage from an attack (after any mit­igation from defense) the remaining damage is applied to the hit location of the attack: reduce it by the Armor Rating (AR) of the hit location (after penetration). A location’s armor rating reflects the sum of the protection a character’s natural and worn armor is providing him on that area. Finally, any remaining damage is dealt to the target on that hit location.
Hit Locations

0 Head
1-2 Right Arm
3-4 Left Arm
5-7 Body
8 Right Leg
9 Left Leg

Wounds & Trauma
Damage that is dealt to a character after mitigation is accrued in the form of Trauma, which is an abstract representation of physical harm. Each point of damage equals a point of trauma. If a character ever accumulates trauma in excess of their Health, they fall unconscious. If their trauma ever exceeds one and one half their Health (round down) the character dies.
Additionally, if a character receives a large amount of trauma from a single source there is a chance they will suffer a Wound. wounds represent the specific injuries caused by more damaging attacks, and not just simple cuts and bruises.
If a character ever receives trauma from a single source in excess of their Wound Threshold, they take a wound: record the level damage type of the damage that caused the wound, and the amount of trauma inflicted to cause the wound.
The severity of a wound is measured in one of four levels, each of which has three associated effects: shock effects, passive effects, and lingering effects. The level of the wound is determined by how much trauma was inflicted to cause it: each level has an associated threshold based on the character’s Wound Threshold that determines the minimum amount of trauma necessary to
cause a wound of that level.
Shock Effects represent the initial effects a character suffers when they first receive a wound. When a character takes a wound, they immediately suffer the shock effects specified by that wound level (which will typically call for an Endurance test).
Passive Effects are an abstract representation of the net effects of the pain and injury caused by a particular wound on the character’s combat effectiveness. After the character has resolved the shock effects of a wound, they begin to suffer its passive effects and continue to do so until the wound is healed.
Lingering Effects represent the more specific effects of the wound that only become fully obvious after a short time has passed. These are the effects that characters are able to fight through for a short time due to the effects of adrenaline. At the end of the combat encounter, or after one minute (12 rounds) (whichever is sooner) after a character suffers a wound, its lin­gering effects kick in. Some of these effects are temporary, while others can be permanent.
“You’re not gonna kill me!”
Lokir of Rorikstead, moments before death

Minor wound (Wound Threshold trauma or greater)
Shock Effects
• The character must pass a +30 Endurance test or lose an action point. If they have none remaining, they begin the next round with one less.
Passive Effects
• The character suffers a -5 penalty to all tests and a -1 to all future initiative rolls while they have this wound.
Major wound (2*Wound Threshold trauma or greater)

Shock Effects

The character must pass a +10 Endurance test or lose an action point. If they have none remaining, they begin the next round with one less.


If the wound is to a limb, the character falls prone (leg) or drops any items held (arm).

Passive Effects
• The character suffers a -10 penalty to all tests and a -2 to all future initiative rolls while they have this wound.
Lingering Effects
• The character gains the blood loss (1d5-3, min 1) condition.
Crippling wound (3*Wound Threshold trauma or greater)

Shock Effects

The character must pass a -10 Endurance test or suffer the lost body part condition as is appropriate for the hit location.


If the wound is to a limb, the character falls prone (leg) or drops any items held (arm).


The character loses an action point. If they have none remaining, they begin the next round with one less.

Passive Effects
• The character suffers a -20 penalty to all tests and a -3 to all future initiative rolls while they have this wound.
Lingering Effects
• The character gains the blood loss (1d5-2, min 1) and crip­pled body part (for the appropriate hit location) conditions.
Severe wound (4*Wound Threshold trauma or greater)

Shock Effects

The character must pass a -30 Endurance test or fall uncon­scious for rounds equal to their degrees of failure.


The character suffers the lost body part condition as is appropriate for the hit location.


The character loses an action point. If they have none remaining, they begin the next round with one less.

Passive Effects
• The character suffers a -40 penalty to all tests and a -4 to all future initiative rolls while they have this wound.
Lingering Effects
• The character gains the blood loss (1d5) and crippled body part (for the appropriate hit location) conditions.

Rending & Impact Damage
Rending and impact wounds are mostly the same, with some important exceptions:

Rending Damage: Double the X value of any blood loss incurred by the wound.


Impact Damage: If a character wound lose an action point due to the shock effects of a Major wound (or higher), they gain the stunned condition for one round instead.

Poison & Magic Damage
If the character receives a wound from poison or magic damage, apply the effects of the wound as you normally would but with an additional bonus effect based on the damage type:

Fire Damage: The character must pass a +20 Agility test or gain the burning (degrees of failure) condition.


Frost Damage: If the character fails the Endurance test for the shock effects of the wound, they take a level of fatigue.


Poison Damage: Ignore blood loss caused by lingering effects. In these cases the character makes a -10 Endurance test when lingering effects would take effect: on failure he gains levels of fatigue equal to his degrees of failure.


Shock Damage: If the character fails the Endurance test for the shock effects of the wound, they lose magicka equal to the trauma inflicted to cause the wound.

Fatigue
A character’s physical exhaustion is measured in terms of Levels of Fatigue. It is usually increased due to strenuous activity, but can also be increased by magic or disease. Increasing amounts of fatigue are measured in levels. GMs are also encouraged to call for characters to make Athletics tests when they see believe the character would risk incurring fatigue due to physical exertion: if a character fails such a test, they should accrue a level of fatigue.
The actual effect of fatigue is fairly simple: for each level of fatigue they possess a character suffers a -10 penalty on all tests and reduces any initiative rolls by 1 (to a minimum of 1).
In order to remove a level of fatigue, a character must rest for a number of hours equal to the character’s total levels of fatigue (a character with five levels must rest five hours to remove the first level, four for the next one, and so forth). They may not engage in any strenuous activity during the recovery period.
If a character accrued one or more of his levels of fatigue through suffocation instead of physical activity, the recovery period is simply one round for each of these levels. Levels of fatigue accrued through blood loss have a recovery period of six hours per level. If a character has levels of fatigue from several sources, remove those with the shortest recovery periods first.
If a character’s levels of fatigue ever exceed the character’s Stamina, the character falls unconscious. If they exceed twice this value, they die.

Healing
There are two main means by which characters can heal damage and wounds which have been dealt to them: natural healing, and magic healing. In order for a character to begin to remove wounds, those wounds must be treated first. If a wound is not treated within a number of days equal to the character’s Endurance bonus, the character becomes Maimed. Any remain­ing lingering effects (except for blood loss) become permanent.
Treating Wounds
A character can make a First Aid (or Profession [Medicine]) test to treat a particular wound that a character is suffering from, preventing it from getting worse and allowing it to begin healing naturally. This takes around five minutes. If a character is attempting to treat themselves, they do so at a -10 penalty.
Treating blood loss
A character suffering from the blood loss (X) condition, or a nearby character, can spend an action point to perform a First Aid skill test, with a +20 bonus to try to stop the bleeding. On success, reduce the X value of the character’s blood loss (X) condition by the degrees of success scored.
Healing Wounds
Wounds are removed in order from the lowest trauma to the highest, but only after any trauma not associated with a given wound has been healed. Once the amount of total trauma removed from the character since the wound was inflicted reaches the amount inflicted to cause the wound, that wound is considered healed, and any non-permanent effects are removed.
Once the wound has been removed, any trauma removed from the character begins counting towards the removal of the next wound (the remaining wound with the lowest associated trauma value). Unfortunately, characters cannot begin to heal crippling wounds (or severe) on their own with just the help of simple First Aid. Such wounds must be treated with a successful Profession [Medicine] skill test before they can be healed. Even after they have been healed, wounds should leave at least some minor physical manifestation (scars, for example). This is left to the GM and the players to work out.

Natural Healing
Characters remove trauma naturally at a rate of EB trauma per day as long as they spend that day resting, and accrue no new trauma. Additionally, a character can make a Profession [Medicine] skill test to accelerate the healing of another character. On success, the healing character removes an additional trauma equal to the character’s degrees of success during the day long rest period that the test was made for (this test may only be made once for any given day). If the character fails the test with more degrees of failure than the injured character’s Endurance bonus, that character does not heal any trauma for that day.
Characters can always remove trauma that is not associated with a particular wound. However, if one of the character’s wounds has not been treated he cannot remove the trauma associated with that wound until he gets it treated.

Magical Healing
Magical healing can remove trauma as well, though it simply removes it in order starting with “unassociated” trauma and then removing the trauma associated with the character’s wounds in order from the lowest trauma wound to the highest (healing each wound normally as its trauma is removed).
Magical healing (in any amount) also automatically treats all of a character’s minor and major wounds, much like the First Aid skill, to prevent the character from becoming maimed and to allow the wounds to heal naturally. Additionally, if a source of magical healing would remove trauma in excess of the character’s wound threshold then any of his crippling or severe wounds count as having been treated with the Profession [Medicine] skill test, and they can begin to heal naturally.

Conditions
Conditions are things that externally affect the character and their capabilities instead of features of the character’s nature.
Blinded
The character loses all vision and suffer the following penalties:

Cannot see anything.


Suffers a -60 to combat tests.


Automatically fail any tests that rely solely on sight.

Blood Loss (X)
The character begins to bleed substantially. The severity is deter­mined by a number X.

Start of Turn: Every minute, a character affected by blood loss suffers X trauma and gains a level of fatigue. Reduce X by 1. If X is ever 0, the character loses the blood loss condition.


Passing Out: If a character becomes unconscious while suffering from blood loss, he no longer reduces X by one every minute. He still suffers trauma but no longer gains fatigue.


Stacking Blood Loss: If a second instance of blood loss is inflicted on a character, the two X values are added together into a new blood loss X value.


Removing Blood Loss: A character suffering from blood loss, or a nearby character, can spend an action point to perform a First Aid skill test, with a +20 bonus to reduce the blood loss. On success, reduce the X value by the degrees of success scored.

Burning (X)
The target is engulfed in flames, with the intensity of the fire determined by a number X.

Start of Turn: At the start of each round, a burning char­acter suffers a single hit of X fire damage to an appropriate hit location (based on the circumstances) to determine the location. This damage ignores all armor. He then doubles X.


Stacking Burning: If a second instance of burning is inflicted on a character, simply combine the two X values into a new burning X value.


Taking Action: A burning character must pass a Willpower test with a -20 penalty at the beginning of a round in order to attempt any action other than putting out the fire during that round.


Putting It Out: A burning character or a nearby ally can attempt to extinguish the flames on their turn by spending an action point and making an Agility test with a +20 bonus, and a -10 penalty for every 5 points of the X value. The burning character becomes Prone and, if the test succeeds, loses the burning condition.

Chameleon (X)
A character with this condition is harder to see for whatever reason. Sight based tests to detect this character are made with a -10 penalty for each point of the X value.

Crippled Body Part
A piece of the character’s body has been rendered temporarily useless. Multiple instances of this condition can affect a character at once as long as each affects a different hit location and/or the body parts associated with that hit location. Any body part that has been crippled suffers all the same penalties as if it had been lost, using lost eye if the head location has been crippled, and the organ damage condition if the body location has been crippled.

Damaged Characteristic (X)
One of the character’s characteristics is reduced due to some effect. The severity is determined by a number X.

Characteristics: Each instance of this condition affects a different characteristic. The specified characteristic score is reduced by X. This cannot reduce the characteristic below 0.


Stacking Damaged Characteristic: A character can only be suffering from one instance of the condition per indi­vidual characteristic. If a second instance is inflicted on a characteristic already suffering from this condition, simply add the two X values together to get a new X value for that specific characteristic.


Zero Characteristics: damaged characteristic can reduce characteristics to zero. If this ever happens, all tests using that characteristic automatically fail regardless of their modifiers.


Attributes: If this would change a characteristic/bonus that determines one of the character’s attributes. Modify that attribute to reflect the changes.

Dazed
The character gains one less action point at the beginning of each round, to a minimum of one.
Deafened The character loses the ability to hear. deafened characters
cannot hear anything and automatically fail any tests that rely
on hearing.

Fortified Characteristic (X)
One of the character’s characteristics is enhanced due to some effect. The severity is determined by a number X.

Characteristics: Each instance of this condition affects a different characteristic. The specified characteristic score is increased by X. This cannot increase the characteristic above 100.


Stacking Fortified Characteristic: A character can only be benefiting from one instance of the condition per individual characteristic. If a second instance is applied on a character­istic that is already benefiting from Fortify Characteristic, simply add the two X values together to get a new X value for that specific characteristic.


Attributes: If this would change a characteristic/bonus that determines one of the character’s attributes. Modify that attribute to reflect the changes.

Frenzied
The character is flung into an uncontrollable rage. Frenzied characters gain the following rules:

Must attempt to engage the nearest enemy in melee combat each turn if able.


If not engaged with the nearest enemy, must move towards that enemy and engage if possible.


May not withdraw from combat if engaged.


Increase Strength, Endurance, and Willpower by 15.


Decrease Personality, Intelligence, and Perception by 15.


Automatically pass all fear tests.


Ignore the effects of their levels of fatigue, though still gains them as normal.


Immune to the effects of the stunned condition.


Suffer a -20 penalty to all defense tests.

Once the encounter has ended, the character must make a Willpower test each round to snap out of his frenzied state. A passed test removes the condition. The character can also make this test as an action during combat to attempt to snap out of frenzy. When frenzy ends, the character gains an additional level of fatigue.

Immobilized
The character is unable to move. Immobilized characters cannot move. They may still attack and take other actions, however.

Invisible
Invisible characters cannot be seen. Characters fail all sight related tests related to spotting the character, and they may only attack him as if they were blinded towards him (meaning they take penalties for blind fighting), assuming they can guess where he might be in the first place.

Lost Body Part
The character loses a part of his body. A character can have multiple instances of this condition at once, each affecting a different body part. If an attack would hit a body part that has been entirely lost, the attack hits the body location instead. This condition applies additional penalties that vary based on the body part. In the case of the head, there is a choice between an ear or an eye (GM’s decision).

Lost Ear
The character has had his ear removed or destroyed, and his hearing damaged. He suffers the following penalties:

All tests that rely on hearing are made with a -20 penalty.


If both ears are lost, the character gains the deafened con­dition permanently.

Lost Eye
The character has had his eye removed or destroyed and suffers the following penalties:

All tests that rely on sight are made with a -20 penalty.


If both eyes are lost, the character gains the blinded con­dition permanently.

Lost Foot/Leg
The character has had his leg severed somewhere between the ankle and the hip, and suffers the following penalties.

Gain the slowed condition permanently.


All tests that rely on the use of two legs are made with a -20 penalty.


If both legs are lost, gain the Immobilized condition per­manently, and automatically fail any tests that rely on the use of legs.

Lost Hand/Arm
The character has had his arm severed somewhere between the wrist and the shoulder, and suffers the following penalties:

Can no longer use two-handed weapons, shields (if the whole arm is missing), or one handed weapons in that arm.


All tests that rely on the use of two hands are made with a -20 penalty.


If both hands are lost, the character cannot wield weapons and automatically fails all tests that rely on the use of hands.

Organ Damage (Lost Body Part: Body)
The character has had an internal organs damaged. Characters with this condition take twice as long to remove trauma by resting, and double the recovery period for levels of fatigue.

Muffled (X)
A character with this condition is harder to hear. Hearing based tests to detect this character are made with a -10 penalty for each point of the X value.

Paralyzed
The character is frozen, unable to move any part of their body. They may take no actions except for Cast Magic (and they make all casting tests with the penalty for being unable to enact the somatic components of the spell, unless they have talents that would negate them).

Silenced
Magically silenced characters believe they are making sound, but in reality their words never pass their lips. As long as the character is not aware of this, any magic they attempt to cast automatically fails as long as the character is utilizing a verbal component in their casting. Treat them as failing with 1 degree of failure. Each round a character is silenced they can roll a Perception test to see if they realize what is happening to them.

Slowed
The character’s movement speed is reduced. A slowed character’s Movement Rating is halved (round down).

Soul Bound
A character with this trait has been bound to a particular soul gem. If they are killed while they have this condition, their soul is trapped within that gem. The soul gem becomes filled, and the soul energy of the soul within the gem is set to the soul energy of the character’s soul. A soul may not be trapped within a soul gem whose maximum soul energy is less than the soul energy of that soul. Additionally, a black soul (the souls of the various peoples of Tamriel, as opposed to those of Daedra or animals) can only be trapped within a black soul gem.

Stunned
The character is overcome by trauma and is unable to act. The character immediately loses all remaining action points upon becoming stunned. Stunned characters do not regain action points at the start of each round.

Unconscious
The character is knocked out and loses consciousness: they fall prone if the circumstances allow it, and they gained the stunned
condition for as long as they’re unconscious.

fear

When a character is confronted by such a frightening event or adversary they must take a Fear Test. Fear tests are Willpower tests that use a special notation, Fear (+/- X), where X is the bonus or penalty applied to the test. If the character fails the test, they succumb to the effects of fear.
The circumstances in which the GM chooses to call for fear tests can have a dramatic impact on the overall feel of a campaign. In general, fear tests with any sort of penalty should be reserved for true horrors and terrifying monsters, and not more “mundane”
terrors.
Fear Effects
If in combat a character fails a fear test he must immediately roll a d100 on the table below, adding +10 to the result for each degree of failure. The effects listed are applied immediately to the character.
If in a non-combat situation the character fails a fear test, the character becomes unnerved and suffers a -10 penalty to any tests that requires concentration on his part. This penalty lasts while the character remains in the vicinity of the object of their fear.
Characters may be able to shake off some of the effects of fear after the initial shock has worn off. The table below will specify certain cases where a character can make a Willpower test when it is his next turn to “snap out” of his fear. If this succeeds then he regains his senses, shrugs off the effects and may act normally from then on. If he fails this test, the effect continues and he may try again when it is his next turn.

Combat Fear Test Results

01-20 The character is badly startled. He may not make any reactions until the beginning of his next turn.
Fear grips the character and he begins to shake and tremble. He suffers a –10 penalty to all tests for the rest of the
21-40 encounter unless he snaps out of it.

Reeling with shock, the character backs away from the thing that confronts them. The character cannot willingly
41-60

approach the object of his fear, and suffers a –10 penalty to all tests until the end of the encounter.
The character is frozen by terror. The character may take no actions until he snaps out of it. After snapping out of it,
61-80

the character will make all tests at a –10 penalty for the rest of the encounter.
Panic grips the character. He must flee the source of his fear, if able, as fast as he can, and if prevented from doing so
81-100

he is at a –20 penalty to all tests. Once away from the danger he must successfully snap out of it to regain control
Fainting dead away, the character keels over and remains unconscious for 1d5 rounds. Once he regains consciousness
101-120

he is still shaken and takes all tests with a –10 penalty until the end of the encounter.
Totally overcome, the character screams and vomits uncontrollably for 1d5 Rounds. During this time he is helpless
121-130

and may take no actions. Afterwards the character gains the dazed condition until the end of the encounter.
The character laughs hysterically and randomly attacks anything near him in a manic frenzy, using whatever weapon
131-140

he has in hand. This effect lasts until the character snaps out of it or until he is knocked unconscious.
The character crumples to the ground for 1d5+1 rounds sobbing, babbling and tearing at his own flesh, and may do 141-150 nothing. Even after he returns to his senses, he is a complete mess and suffers a –20 penalty to all tests until the end of the encounter.
151-170 The character’s mind snaps and he becomes catatonic for 1d5 hours and may not be roused.
The character is so affected that he begins to see strange and terrible visions as his hold on reality shatters. The
171+

character gains the Damaged Willpower (1d10+3) condition permanently.

movement & enCumBranCe

It is often useful to know exactly how far a character can walk in an hour, or how much they can carry during the trip. This section contains rules for different types of character movement and interaction with objects in the environment.

Movement
Movement is broken down into three speeds: standard, fast, and flat out. When a character takes the movement action he may specify which speed he wishes to move at, which will determine factors such as when he can next attack and what kinds of reactions he can make.
Standard Movement
Standard pace represents walking or light jogging. In structured time, a character moving at standard pace can move a number of meters less than or equal to their Movement Rating in a turn of movement.

If the character ends their movement within engagement range of an opponent the character may become engaged and make a melee attack action (of any kind) for free.


Alternatively, the character can make any non-melee attack action (except move or delay) for free at any point during his movement.

In narrative time, a character moving at standard pace can move a number of meters equal to 12 times their movement rating in one minute, and 60 times that amount in one hour.
Fast Movement
Fast pace represents a fast jog or a standard run. In structured time, characters moving at fast pace can move a number of meters less than or equal to three times their movement rating in a turn of movement.
• If the character ends their movement within engagement range of an opponent the character may become engaged but does not receive a free attack.
In narrative time, a character moving at fast pace can move a number of meters equal to 3 times their narrative standard speed.
“There was a collective intake of breath at the sight of his graceful movements. His swords seemed to be a part of him, a tail coming from his arms to match the one behind him. It was a trick of counterbalance, allowing the young serpent man to roll up into a circle and spin into the center of the ring in offensive position. The Prince had to plod forward the less impressive traditional way.”
“2920, The Last Year of the First Era”

Flat Out Movement
Flat out pace represents a full sprint. In structured time, char­acters moving at a flat out pace can move a number of meters less than or equal to five times their movement rating in a turn of movement.

If the character ends their movement within engagement range of an opponent the character may become engaged but does not receive a free attack.


If a character moves flat out during his turn he can only attempt to Evade attacks, no other defense is possible. He does so at a -20 penalty.

In narrative time, a character moving at flat out pace can move a number of meters equal to 5 times their narrative standard speed.
Swimming
When a character is swimming, use their standard speed for the distance they move in the water. This is not exact, and the GM should feel free to increase or decrease this value slightly if he feels it’s appropriate.
Climbing
When a character is swimming, use their standard speed for the distance they move up or down the surface. This is not exact, and the GM should feel free to increase or decrease this value slightly if he feels it’s appropriate.
Jumping
A character may also make an Acrobatics test to jump over an obstacle, either horizontally or vertically. For every second spent moving just before the jump the character receives a 10 bonus on the test.
When jumping vertically, on success he jumps up a number of meters equal to half his Agility bonus(rounded down). If the character fails a vertical jump, he takes falling damage as if he had fallen that many meters.
When jumping horizontally he jumps a number of meters equal to his Agility bonus. If the character fails a horizontal jump, he takes falling damage for a number of meters equal to half that distance.
Falling
Falling even a relatively short distance can be quite dangerous if a character is unlucky. Falling inflicts 1d10
[meters fallen beyond 2] Impact damage to a random hit location (representing the part of the body that hits the ground first). This damage ignores armor.

Encumbrance
Encumbrance represents the mass and bulk of the items the character is wearing, wielding, or carrying on their person. The Encumbrance Value (ENC) of an item is a single digit number that represents this. Items with an ENC of zero are, on their own, inconsequential. But if a character is carrying a large number of these items, treat every 10 zero ENC items as having a total ENC of one.
If a character is carrying an item in such a way that the space it takes up isn’t an issue (such as inside another, larger item), its ENC is halved (round down).
When worn, the ENC of a given piece of armor is halved (round down). Shields do not benefit from this effect.
Encumbrance Levels
The number of times that a character’s total ENC (the sum of the ENC of all the equipment they are carrying) exceeds their Carry Rating determines their Encumbrance Level, which represents how much the bulk and weight of their gear hinders their ability to function.
Higher encumbrance levels impose additional penalties to cast­ing tests (any test to manifest some form of magic that relies on somatic components), and to the character’s Agility (and any attributes derived from it).
Each encumbrance level also has an associated value, which is used for fatigue related calculations: characters with higher encumbrance levels get tired more quickly than they would otherwise.

Encumbrance Levels and Effects

Minimal (0) <=> Carry Rating -5 No Penalty
Substantial (2) > 2 times Carry Rating -10 -5
Moderate (3) > 3 times Carry Rating -15 -10
Heavy (4) > 4 times Carry Rating -20 -15

Very Heavy (5) > 5 times Carry Rating -25 -20

luCk

Luck is unique amongst the other characteristics in that it represents something more abstract than a character’s physical strength or mental resilience. Luck reflects the tendency of events to work out in a character’s favor. This can seem to represent nothing more than coincidence or good fortune, but destiny and fate play a role as well.
Because Luck governs no skills, a character will not be called upon to test it as often as they might for another characteristic. Luck is used in several ways: it determines a characters chance of critical success or failure (as detailed in Core Mechanics in Chapter 1), they can spend Luck points for certain benefits, they can attempt Luck rolls in certain circumstances, and they can burn Luck permanently in exchange for a number of powerful effects. Beyond using Luck to confirm critical results, NPCs cannot benefit from these mechanics.
Characters cannot advance Luck outside of character creation, but the GM should feel free to reward Luck on special occasions.

Spending Luck Points
Each session a character is afforded a number of Luck points, (see Defining a Character in Chapter 1). Characters may spend these luck points in order to influence their character’s fate:
Characters may spend a Luck point whenever they fail a test. If they do so, the character may immediately reroll that failed test. This may be done multiple times for a given test, but the character must spend a luck point for each reroll.
A character can also spend a Luck point to add a degree of success to a successful test (including one passed using spent Luck points). This can be done multiple times for a given test.

Luck Rolls
In certain situations the GM can call upon the character to make a Luck test in scenarios when he needs to determine whether or not some random event happens to work in the character’s favor. For example, if a character is knocking on doors during the night trying to find someone to help them, the GM could have the character make a Luck roll to determine if someone happens to be at awake to hear them.

Burning Luck
The player characters are the heroes of the story, and fortune favors heroes! Characters may choose to permanently reduce their Luck score by one or more points in order to benefit from a number of different effects. This is known as Burning Luck.
Luck that a character burns never regenerates naturally, though the character can take Luck advances like they would with any other characteristic in order to increase their score again. A character may burn any amount of Luck at any time. Characters may burn Luck for the following effects:

Burn 1 Luck: Re-roll a failed test.


Burn 1 Luck: Add a degree of success to a successful test.


Burn 1 Luck: Upgrade a successful test to a critical success. This must be done immediately after the test is rolled.


Burn 1 Luck: Negate the effects of a critical failure. This must be done immediately after the test is rolled.


Burn 10 Luck (or all remaining Luck, if less than 10 remains): Survive an encounter or wound that would have otherwise killed them, but in a heavily injured state. The character is immediately considered removed from the encounter. The GM may need to get creative to accomplish this, and in a few cases it should be impossible.

Size

Tamriel is home to creatures of many shapes and sizes. A char­acter’s size affects them in a number of critical ways. There are seven different size categories. Round down whenever percent­ages are involved. Percentage based modifiers only apply to the base value in question (before any other such modifiers).
Puny
This category is reserved for the smallest of creatures like kwama foragers, rats, or mice. The following effects apply to characters of this size category:

Reduce the character’s Damage Bonus to 0.


Attack tests made against the characters suffer a -40 penalty.


Reduce the character’s Health and WT to 1.


Reduce the character’s Carry Rating to 1.


Reduce the character’s Movement Rating by 75%.

Tiny
This category includes smaller characters like cats or large cave rats. The following effects apply to characters of this size category:

Reduce the character’s Damage Bonus to 0.


Attack tests made against the characters suffer a -20 penalty.


Reduce the character’s Health and WT by 50%.


Reduce the character’s Carry Rating by 75%.


Reduce the character’s Movement Rating by 50%.

Small
This category includes everything ranging from quadrupeds like wolves to smaller bipeds like goblins. The following effects apply to characters of this size category:

Halve the character’s Damage Bonus.


Attack tests made against the characters suffer a -10 penalty.


Reduce the character’s Health and WT by 25%.


Reduce the character’s Carry Rating by 25%.


Reduce the character’s Movement Rating by 25%.

Standard
Standard sized characters fall fairly close to the average size for man or mer. There are no effects associated with this category.
Large
This category includes characters that are substantially larger than average, including quadrupeds like horses and larger bipeds like trolls. The following effects apply to characters of this size category:

Increase the character’s Damage Bonus by 50%.


Attack tests made against the characters receive a +10 bonus.


Increase the character’s Health and WT by 25%.


Increase the character’s Carry Rating by 25%.


Increase the character’s Movement Rating by 25%.

Huge
This category includes very large characters such as giants or larger dwemer constructs. The following effects apply to char­
acters of this size category:

Double the character’s Damage Bonus.


Attack tests made against the characters receive a +20 bonus.


Increase the character’s Health and WT by 50%.


Increase the character’s Carry Rating by 75%.


Increase the character’s Movement Rating by 50%.

Enormous This category is reserved for extremely large characters, like
dragons. The following effects apply to characters of this size
category:

Triple the character’s Damage Bonus.


Attack tests made against the characters receive a +40 bonus.


Double the character’s Health and WT.


Double the character’s Carry Rating.


Increase the character’s Movement Rating by 75%.

CharaCter advanCement

The primary means by which characters progress in the UESRPG is through the accumulation and use of Experience Points (also known as XP) awarded by the GM. XP can be spent by characters to purchase characteristic advances, train new skills, increase skill ranks, gain specializations, learn new magic, and purchase talents. Remember that learning and ranking skills or talents governed by a favored characteristic, or advancing that characteristic, costs half of the usual XP cost (round down).
XP represents time spent learning new things, and the knowl­edge gleaned from the character’s experiences. Players should keep in mind the ways in which their character reasonably could have advanced as a result of their experiences. In other words: use common sense when determining what to spend XP on. Though this does not mean that players must be entirely realistic in determining what to advance between sessions, only that they should keep practical concerns in mind.
Keep in mind that this table is different from the CrP table found at the end of Chapter 2. Once characters are out of character creation, they are more restricted in what they can purchase (hence the use of XP as opposed to the more flexible CrP).

Character Advancement XP Costs

Characteristic Advance (5)* 100(Char. Bonus) XP* Learning a Skill (Novice Rank) 100 XP
Increasing Rank 100*(Current Rank)
100 XP Gaining a Specialization 100 XP
Expanding Combat Style 25 XP
Learning a Talent Varies by Talent Level
Novice Level 100 XP
Apprentice Level 200 XP
Journeyman Level 300 XP
Adept Level 400 XP
Expert Level 600 XP
Master Level 800 XP

Learning Magic Varies by Magic
Standard Spell 5*(Spell Level) XP
Advanced Ritual 25 XP
Word of Power 50 XP
Shehai technique Varies by technique
Congruence Power Varies by Power

  • Minimum base cost (before % mods) of 100 XP. ** Characters cannot advance Luck with XP.

Chapter 5 Game Mechanics

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