Chapter 3 Skills

Chapter 3: Skills

“To achieve true mastery, you must understand what it is you’re doing. It ain’t simply enough to perform a perfect thrust of a blade — you must also know what you are doing and why.”
Seryne Relas, “Breathing Water”

A
character’s skills are a set of categories and associated ranks that reflect a character’s ability to perform certain actions. The ranks reflect the character’s experience, training, and overall ability to perform these various actions. Skills are either trained, or untrained. Each trained skill has a corresponding Skill Rank, which has an associated value from 0 to 5, which reflects how capable the character is at utilizing that skill. Each skill has one or more Governing Characteristics: a set of characteristics that reflect the many ways that a character can utilize a single skill.
When a character makes a skill test, he applies a bonus equal to +10 times the value of his skill rank (starting at +0 for novice (rank 0), and up to +50 at master (rank 5)) to the base charac­teristic. If a character attempts to use a skill that is untrained
instead of trained, the test suffers a -10 penalty instead.
Specializations
Skills can also have accompanying specializations, which
represent areas of concentration and focus in a character’s
training and experience with that skill. A character may take
as many specializations as their rank in a given skill, plus one. When making a skill test in the listed area of specialization,
the character gains a +10 bonus to the test.
Skill Types
There are two types of skills, Standard Skills and Field Skills. Standard skills function as described above, but field skills are different, and can be identified by the “[Field]” in their name.
Field skills are collections of related skills that all function inde­pendently as standard skills. For example: Profession [Smithing] and Profession [Commerce] function like separate standard skills that must be trained and ranked up independently. Both skills have their own separate skill rank, though they function similarly because they share the same “parent” skill. In some cases, the fields will share the exact same governing characteristics, but in others each field will have its own.
Leaning and Advancing Skills
The XP cost to learn a skill (upgrade it to trained, novice rank) is 100 XP. From then on, increasing a skill’s rank costs 100 XP plus 100 XP times the desired rank. Skill ranks must be advanced in order.
Favored Skills
A character’s favored skills are those skills that are governed by at least one of the character’s Favored Characteristics. Favored skills cost half the usual XP to advance in rank (round down).
Skill Ranks

Novice (0) Rudimentary knowledge.
Apprentice (1) Basic proficiency.
Journeyman (2) Hands on experience and/or some professional training.
Adept (3) Extensive experience or training.
Expert (4) Professional level ability.
Master (5) Complete mastery.

Skills

Acrobatics Strength, Agility
Alchemy Intelligence
Alteration Willpower
Athletics Strength, Endurance
Charm Personality
Combat Style [Field] Strength, Agility
Command Intelligence, Personality
Commerce Intelligence, Personality
Conjuration Willpower
Deceive Intelligence, Personality
Destruction Willpower
Enchant Intelligence
Evade Agility
First Aid Agility, Intelligence
Illusion Willpower
Investigate Intelligence, Perception
Intimidate Strength, Willpower
Linguistics Intelligence
Logic Intelligence, Perception
Lore Intelligence
Mysticism Willpower
Navigate Intelligence, Perception
Necromancy Intelligence
Observe Perception
Profession [Field] (Varies)
Restoration Willpower

Ride Agility
Shehai Shen She Ru Strength, Agility, Willpower
Stealth Agility, Perception
Subterfuge Agility, Intelligence
Survival Intelligence, Perception
Thu’um Willpower

Skill deSCriptionS

This section gives an overview of each skill, what that skill rep­resents, its governing characteristics (listed in parenthesis), and recommendations for common applications of the skill.

Acrobatics (Strength, Agility)
Acrobatics covers the spectrum of physical activities involving explosive body movements and extreme feats of flexibility and balance. This includes everything from leaping and jumping to expertly executed rolls, and other maneuvers. For rules regarding jumping, see Movement & Encumbrance in Chapter 5.
Escape Bindings
A character can make an Acrobatics (Ag) test to free himself from bonds, such as ropes or manacles. This takes several minutes. The difficulty of the test should be proportionate to the mate­rials used to bind the character, and the quality of the binding. Higher degrees of success on the attempt should reduce the time required. If the character fails, the bonds are simply too tight to escape unless the situation changes somehow. If the character fails with a number of degrees of failure greater than his AB then they create a lot of noise in the course of their escape attempt, or perhaps even injure themselves. The test can be opposed by
a Subterfuge (Ag) test made by the opponent who secured the bonds. This test cannot be re-attempted.

Alchemy (Intelligence)
Alchemy is the arcane art of brewing potions and poisons by combining ingredients in order to exploit their magical effects. This skill can be used to create a variety of concoctions with an almost uncountable number of effects, ranging from potions
of levitation or healing, to magical poisons that rot a victim from the inside out. The rules for brewing potions are handled in Alchemy in Chapter 6.
Identify Effect
A Character can make an Alchemy (Int) test to identify the effects of an ingredient. This takes several minutes. This involves testing the ingredient in a controlled environment, and requires alchemical tools of some kind. Success on the test will reveal the ingredient quality to the character, and higher degrees of success could impart a small bonus to future brewing tests with that ingredient if the GM deems it appropriate. Failure means the character has failed to discover the nature of the ingredient, and if the character fails with a number of degrees of failure greater than his IB, then there is an accident and the ingredient is destroyed. Stranger and more obscure ingredients should make for a more difficult test.

Alteration (Willpower)
This skill influences the use of spells from the school of Alteration. As a school, Alteration focuses on altering the physical and magical properties of objects and beings. For detailed rules regarding the use of this skill, see Chapter 6.

Athletics (Strength, Endurance)
Athletics covers a range of physical activities including climbing, swimming, lifting, and pushing. It also represents the ability to perform these activities under stress, or with little to no preparation. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the nature of the physical feat itself. For more information, see Movement & Encumbrance in Chapter 5.

Charm (Personality)
Charm is a measure of the character’s knack for impressing people and influencing them. The acting character’s attitude is key in distinguishing between this and other interaction focused skills. Charm requires the character to assume a non-hostile attitude and not make any explicit or implicit threats. This skill can be used for everything from seduction, to following social protocol, to bragging and boasting, to simply winning someone over on a personal level. Normally, a character can only affect a number of targets equal to his Personality bonus with a Charm test. Charm tests are most often opposed by Willpower tests if the target wishes to resist.
Brag
A character can make a Charm test to win someone over by flaunting his importance or accomplishments. This takes at least a minute. On a success, the person or people he is addressing are sufficiently impressed. If the test fails, the target rejects the character or their accomplishments. Less impressive achieve­ments (or less easily impressed targets) should make for a more difficult test. This test cannot be re-attempted on the same target.

Captivate
A character can make a Charm test to win someone over. This takes at least one minute. If the test fails, the target rejects the character, potentially making a bad situation even worse. The difficulty can be based on the target’s predisposition towards the
character, relations between the factions each character associates with, and so forth. This test can be opposed by a Willpower test. The test cannot be re-attempted on the same person.

Seduce
A character can make a Charm test to try to seduce someone. How this is executed can vary greatly depending on the target. The difficulty of the test can be based on a number of factors, including the character’s approach and the attitude of the target. This test can be opposed by a Willpower test. The test cannot be re-attempted on the same person in the same situation.

Combat Style [Field] (Strength, Agility)
Fighting skills are packaged into Combat Styles, which represent the complete package of training, tactics, and experience that constitutes a specific style of combat. Combat Styles can be associated with culture, careers, or even schools of combat.
Specifically, individual Combat Styles are represented by the Combat Style [Field] skill, where the field represents the name of the combat style. This skill is used to make melee or ranged attack tests, and defense tests, in combat when using the equip­ment (weapons and shields) associated with the style. For full information on Combat Styles, see Combat in Chapter 5.

Command (Intelligence, Personality)
Often a character needs to rally a group of other characters for some purpose. Command measures a character’s skill at coordinating allies, inspiring them, and instilling fear if necessary in order to motivate them. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the nature of the action the character is taking and the way they choose to go about it. Normally, a character can only affect a number of targets equal to five times his Personality bonus with a Command test.
Inspire
A character can make a Command (Prs) test to inspire followers through praise, careful direction, or simply by setting a good example. The difficulty of the test should be modified by the challenge that the group faces, and the general morale of the group itself. On success, the character can inspire a number of allied targets up to his Personality bonus who are within 10 meters. Characters inspired this way make their next test with a +10 bonus. This test cannot be re-attempted (and characters cannot gain the bonus more than once) within a single given situation or encounter.

Commerce (Intelligence, Personality)
Commerce reflects a character’s ability to engage in business related activities. This could involve running a business, haggling for a single item, locating an item for sale, or anything relating to the practical application of their economic skill. The rules for using the Commerce skill to acquire items, or to bargain for lower or higher prices, are handled in Pricing & Acquisition in Chapter 7.
Appraise
A character can make a Commerce (Int) test to examine an unknown item to determine essential aspects of its nature. This takes about a minute. Each degree of success on the test reveals one piece of information about the item to the character. If the character’s degrees of failure on the test exceed his Intelligence bonus, he receives grossly inaccurate information instead. This test cannot be re-attempted.

Conjuration (Willpower)
This skill influences the use of spells from the school of Conjuration. As a school, Conjuration focuses on calling upon and and interacting with various otherworldly entities. For detailed rules regarding the use of this skill, see Chapter 6.

Deceive (Intelligence, Personality)
Deceive measure’s a character’s aptitude for fooling others into believing something that is not true. A Deceive test should only be required if the character believes that he is lying. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the way the character chooses to go about constructing the deception. This test can be opposed by a Logic test or an Observe test, depending on the nature of the deception.
Blather
A character can make a Deceive test against a target to stall for time, confusing and distracting the target through random stories, unexpected questions, or complex language. This takes about a minute. This test can be opposed by an Observe (Int) test. The test cannot be re-attempted for the same target.

Destruction (Willpower)
This skill influences the use of spells from the school of Destruction. As a school, Destruction focuses on harming targeted objects and beings through the use of various kinds of elemental and magical attacks. For detailed rules regarding the use of this skill, see Chapter 6.

Enchant (Intelligence)
Enchanting is the arcane art of creating enchanted items by binding the energy contained within soul gems to another phys­ical object. The specific uses of the Enchanting skill for creating enchanted items are handled in Enchanting in Chapter 6.
Identify Enchantment
A Character can make an Enchant (Int) test to identify the effects of an enchanted item. This takes several minutes. This involves testing the item through the use of several different incantations. Success on the test will reveal the nature of the item’s enchantment to the character. Failure means the character has failed to discover the nature of the enchantment, and if the character fails with a number of degrees of failure greater than his Intelligence bonus, then he receives inaccurate information. A strange or unfamiliar enchantment should make for a more difficult test. This test can be re-attempted.

Evade (Agility)
Evade measure’s a character’s ability to escape from observed, impending danger through the use of fluid movement and quick reaction times. This skill is used to defend against attacks in combat. For rules regarding its use, see Combat in Chapter 5.

First Aid (Agility, Intelligence)
First Aid is a character’s ability to provide stabilizing medical
care to Wounded characters. For information on the various uses of this skill, see Physical Health in Chapter 5.

Illusion (Willpower)
This skill influences the use of spells from the school of Illusion. As a school, Illusion focuses on manipulation and deception to affect the minds of targets and the light around them. For detailed rules regarding the use of this skill, see Chapter 6.

Investigate (Intelligence, Perception)
Investigate reflects the character’s skill at conducting an inves­tigation. This encompasses everything from simple inquiries to coordinating a complex investigation and searching through piles of clues to find an answer. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the way the character chooses to go about conducting their investigation and the nature of the particular test.
Inquiry
A character can make an Investigate test to gain information from a group by asking questions, stimulating conversations, or simply eavesdropping. This usually takes at least fifteen minutes. The test assumes the character does not know the targets and may be in an unfamiliar area. The difficulty is based on the subjects’ attitudes towards the character, and the approach used. If some, or all, of the group members know what the character wants to know, then one or two degrees of success reveals general
information, while more can uncover far more details. Failure results in the character learning nothing, and if the character fails with more degrees of failure than his Intelligence bonus, he receives faulty information. This test cannot be re-attempted within the same group to ascertain the same information unless the GM rules that the time spent on the first attempt was insufficient to speak to everyone.

Study
A character can make an Investigate test to sift through large amounts of information in search of relevant details. The char­acter needs to know roughly what they’re looking for. One or two degrees of success should reveal general information, while more reveals hidden secrets or more details, assuming that any of this is there to find. This test can be re-attempted on the same resource until the GM decides the character has accessed all available information, but each subsequent test takes twice the time of the previous one.

Intimidate (Strength, Willpower)
The Intimidate skill is a measure of a character’s ability to instill fear in others. This ability may be used to make a target do something against their will or to extract information. This can be accomplished either through direct shows of force or through the use of subtle mind games and veiled threats. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the way the character chooses to attempt to intimidate their target.
Terrify
A character can make an Intimidate test as a reaction after any of his allies fail a fear test to make them more afraid of failing him than the thing that triggered the fear test. On success, a number of allied characters up to the acting character’s Personality bonus and within 10 meters subtract the degrees of success earned by the Intimidate test from the degrees of failure suffered on their fear test. The targets then determine the results of the fear tests using the reduced degrees of failure. If the resulting degrees of failure are zero or lower for one or more of the targets, those targets are treated as if they passed the fear test.

Linguistics (Intelligence)
Linguistics represents the ability to speak, read, and write specific languages, codes, and ciphers. When attempting to commu­nicate using a language a character knows, a Linguistics test is only required for a particularly difficult task such as translating an ancient version of the language or attempting to understand a poorly recorded document. This skill can also be used to attempt to communicate silently, or to translate older versions of a known language. Unknown languages always require a Linguistics test to understand on any level.
Communicate
A character can make a Linguistics test to convey or comprehend a message that involves the use of an unknown language using subtext or a limited vocabulary. Alternatively, the character can use non-verbal signals to communicate silently with someone with whom they share a spoken or written language, but they are only able to use gestures. The more degrees of success gained on the test, the better the characters on both sides are able to comprehend the message. A more complex message should call for a more difficult test. If the character fails the test by more degrees of failure than his Intelligence bonus, he relays incorrect information. This test cannot be re-attempted with the same message and the same target.
Translate A character can make a Linguistics test to decipher a code or
archaic text in a known language, or to pull small details from a text in an unknown tongue. Fully deciphering such text requires a large amount of time. If the character has access to a lexicon for the language, this should grant a situational modifier. However, some texts benefit much less from the aid of a formal lexicon. The more degrees of success on the test, the more information is gained from the text. Degrees of failure greater than the
character’s Intelligence bonus should return a mistranslation. This test cannot be re-attempted on the same resource unless the character has acquired new expertise.

Note – Character Languages
The various peoples of Tamriel speak a variety of different languages, and keeping track of all of them could make for a very confusing experience. Fortunately, most charac­ters during most eras will likely speak Tamrielic/Cyrodiilic in addition to their native tongue (they may have even been raised with it, depending on how integrated into the empire of the day their province is). It is highly recommended that players not create characters that are incapable of communicating with the rest of the party, for
obvious reasons.

Logic (Intelligence, Perception)
The Logic skill represents a character’s ability to think logically, solve puzzles, and dissect information rationally and quickly. This skill also encompasses a character’s understanding of math­ematics, physics, and engineering concepts (though it does not include any of the specific theory or terminology). The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on whether or not the character is relying on sheer mental prowess,
or using their intuition.
Gambling A character can attempt a Logic test when participating in games
of chance to try to improve their odds beyond simple blind luck. The more degrees of success gained, the higher the character’s chance of winning becomes. This assumes that the character is playing by the rules. This test can be opposed by a Logic test
as long as the nature of the game permits it.

Lore (Intelligence)
Lore represents a character’s ability to recall information of all types. This includes any knowledge that they would possess due to their education or experience and is meant to represent a character’s general knowledge. Specializations in this skill reflect a character’s focus on one particular subject. Remember that “general knowledge and education” is a relative term: no matter how smart a character is, they shouldn’t be able to roll to recall an obscure fact about Daedra unless they would have reasonably encountered the fact before.
Mysticism (Willpower)
This skill influences the use of spells from the school of Mysticism.
As a school, Mysticism is a rather obscure discipline focused

on manipulating magicka itself to produce a number of exotic
effects. For detailed rules regarding the use of this skill, see Chapter 6.

Navigate (Intelligence, Perception)
The Navigate skill reflects a character’s ability to plot and follow a course from one point to another, as well as the ability to provide directions and lead others along the plotted course. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the way the character is approaching a particular test.
Staying on Course
A character can make a Navigate (Prc) test when traveling along an unfamiliar route to avoid becoming lost or side-tracked. On success, the character follows the route and does not need to test again unless something changes. Failure results in the character getting lost, while failing with degrees of failure greater than the character’s Perception bonus results in the character not even noticing that he is lost. This test cannot be re-attempted.

Planning/Mapping
A character can make a Navigate (Int) test to gain their bear­ings in an unfamiliar area or plot a journey through unknown terrain. This can take just a few moments, or a few hours for a complex map. This test can also be used to generate a map of the character’s travels, or to recognize inaccuracies in an existing map. More degrees of success result in better courses or maps, while failing with degrees of failure greater than the character’s Intelligence bonus results in a fatally flawed course/ map. This test can be re-attempted for the same location, but each subsequent test takes twice the time of the previous one.

Necromancy (Intelligence)
Necromancy is the study and art of raising the dead. While it is not traditionally recognized as a school of magic, it functions similarly, and thus is treated as a school for the purposes of this book. For detailed rules regarding the use of this skill, see Chapter 6.

Observe (Perception)
Observe represents a character’s general awareness of his sur­roundings and his ability to notice things that others might dismiss. This encompasses alertness and the ability to interpret signs correctly. These could be signs in a character’s environment, or signs in another character’s behavior.
Awareness
A character can make an Observe (Prc) test to notice a small detail, sound, or smell before others and interpret what it might mean. The difficulty is proportionate to the subtlety of the clue, and the character’s familiarity with the subject matter/ environment. More degrees of success reveal more information, while degrees of failure in excess of the character’s Sense bonus result in a bad judgment and false information. This test can be opposed by a Stealth test. A failed test cannot be re-attempted.

Scrutiny
A character can make an Observe test to determine an individ­ual’s truthfulness, motives, and temperament. The difficulty of the test is proportionate to the subtlety of the clue sought. Failure results in no information, while failing with degrees of failure in excess of the character’s Perception bonus being tested results in false information/bad judgment. This test can be opposed by a Deceive test. This test cannot be re-attempted on the same object or person unless additional information becomes available.

Profession [Field] (Varies)
Profession [Field] represents the character’s formal or informal training and experience in a specific profession. It is used to perform work related tasks, or to reference specialized knowledge that someone trained in that profession might have. The follow­ing table contains a list of common fields and their governing characteristics. Feel free to invent your own with GM permission.
Profession Fields

Acting Personality
Animal Trainer Intelligence
Art Personality
Bureaucracy Intelligence
(Physical Crafts) Agility

Engineering Intelligence
Medicine Intelligence
Musicianship Agility
Seamanship Intelligence
Smithing Strength
For information regarding the use of the Profession [Medicine] skill to care for injured characters, see Physical Health in Chapter
5. For information regarding the various crafting oriented pro­fessions, see Crafting in Chapter 7.

Restoration (Willpower)
This skill influences the use of spells from the school of Restoration. As a school, Restoration is focused on healing and restoring targets in a variety of ways, as well as harming undead beings. For rules regarding the use of this skill, see Chapter 6.

Ride (Agility)
Ride is a measure of the character’s ability to control and remain mounted on those creatures that are trained to be ridden. This skill can be applied to a diverse range of beasts, even flying or swimming creatures. A character does not normally need to make a skill test to ride an animal if they have this skill trained, but they may be called to do so in certain more difficult or stressful situations, or if they’re learning to ride an unfamiliar animal. For mounted combat rules, see Combat in Chapter 5.

Shehai Shen She Ru (Strength, Agility,
Willpower)
The Shehai Shen She Ru, or “Way of the Spirit Sword,” is the

culmination of the art of sword-singing, practiced by ancient
Redguards in Yokuda known as sword-singers. The greatest of
the sword-singers were known as Ansei, or “Saints of the Sword.”
The core of the Shehai Shen She Ru is a simple devotion to
swordsmanship. This is how every sword singer begins his
journey: through intense study, and eventual mastery, of the

art of the blade.

In game terms, this means that characters can utilize the Shehai
Shen She Ru skill (with either Strength or Agility) as if it were
the Combat Style [Field] skill whenever wielding any type of
sword (larger or smaller weapons, such as daggers and greats-
words, also count).

There are other aspects to the Shehai Shen She Ru, but these
are explored in the Shehai Shen She Ru section in Chapter 8.

Note
In order to train the Shehai Shen She Ru skill, purchase any of the related talents, or use any of the related abilities, a character must possess the Sword-Singer elite advance.

Stealth (Agility, Perception)
Stealth is a measure of a character’s ability to remain unnoticed in a variety of settings and environments through the employ­ment of specific techniques. Everything from concealment, to shadowing, to simple sneaking falls under this skill. This test can be opposed by an Observe test when appropriate.
Shadowing
A character can make a Stealth (Prc) test in order to pursue another character without being observed. If the character succeeds, he can follow the target unobserved for 5 minutes for each degree of success scored on the test. If the test fails, the character is spotted by his target. This test can be opposed by an Observe test. A failed test cannot be reattempted. A successful test must be re-attempted after the time determined by degrees of success has passed.

Subterfuge (Agility, Intelligence)
The Subterfuge skill is a measure of the character’s ability to use artifice, guile, and manual dexterity to circumvent normal limits and restrictions. This includes things like disguising oneself, breaking security systems, sleight of hand, and so on. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the way the character is approaching a particular test and the nature of that test.
Disguise
A character can make a Subterfuge (Int) test to disguise himself or another. This can be a simple “costume change,” or an elab­orate scheme to impersonate a specific character. The character doesn’t make the test when creating the disguise, instead they make the test the first time the disguise comes under scrutiny from an opponent. On success, the character does not need to test again unless something changes. Failure gives away the disguise. Note this covers only the physical aspects of costuming, if the character must interact with others any required tests are covered by other skills – most often Charm or Deceive – though a good costume can assist a character in these tests. This test can be opposed by an Observe test. This test cannot be re-attempted against a person who is already aware of the disguise.

Security
A character can make a Subterfuge (Ag) test to overcome locks and safeguards securing a door or chest. This skill can also be used to disarm all sorts of traps once a character has detected them. Failure with a degrees of failure greater than the character’s Agility bonus results in the character accidentally setting off the trap, thinking they disarmed a trap when they really didn’t, or jamming a lock such that it cannot be opened. This test can be opposed by an Observe test. This test can be re-attempted.

Sleight of Hand
A character can make a Subterfuge (Ag) test to palm a small object unnoticed, pick someone’s pocket, or perform a task requiring trickery and manual dexterity. The test can substitute papers, remove jewelry, or obtain a target’s money. The difficulty of the test varies with the size of the object and intensity of observation. This test can be opposed by an Observe test. This test cannot be re-attempted once noticed.

Survival (Intelligence, Perception)
The Survival skill is a measure of a character’s ability to subsist away from civilization. The difficulty is associated with the local environmental constraints. Use of the skill does not only indicate a knack for finding life’s essentials, but an aptitude for avoiding threats. The choice of which governing characteristic to use should be based on the way the character is approaching a particular test and the nature of that test.
Scrounging
A character can make a Survival (Int) test to attempt to find enough food and water to keep him alive in whatever environ­ment he is currently in. This takes at least a half hour. If the characters run out of food or water, they may begin to suffer from starvation and dehydration. The difficulty for the test is dependent upon the environment, and in some places the test may be impossible. This test can be reattempted, though each subsequent test takes twice the time of the previous one.

Tracking
A character can make a Survival (Prc) test to follow signs left by his quarry, allowing him to track the target’s passage. The difficulty of the test depends on the time since the trail was left, the weather, the lighting conditions, smoke, or fog. Terrain conditions also play a role. If the character fails the test by more degrees of failure than his Perception bonus he unknowingly follows the wrong trail. This test can be opposed by a Subterfuge (Int) test in situations where the quarry is attempting to cover up their trail. This test can be reattempted.

Wrangling
A character can make a Survival (Int) test to tame, train, and ride animals he encounters in his travels. The time this takes varies wildly depending on the animal in question. This test can be reattempted, but each subsequent test takes twice the time of the previous test.

Thu’um (Willpower)
Thu’um represents the skill of a character with the Thu’um or “Voice.” For detailed rules regarding the use of this skill, see
Thu’um in Chapter 8.

Note
In order to train the Thu’um skill, purchase any of the related talents, or use any of the related abilities, a character must possess the Voice elite advance.

Chapter 3 Skills

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